mRNA vaccines appear to be damaging red blood cells

Citing experts at the Meedan Digital Health Lab, Reuters Fact Check vigorously asserts that the spike proteins induced by the COVID vaccines do not kill or damage cells.

Perhaps so, but something from the vaccines is causing deformations and apparent inflammation in red blood cells, as evidenced by images from microscopy photos. Images of blood cells taken before and after the vaccines can be seen starting about two minutes into the five-minute video. Postvaccine red blood cells exhibit rough instead of smooth edges, irregular shapes, and grouping together over time which is described as the “beginning form of thrombosis,” or blood clots. More research is needed to determine exactly what is causing these cell deformations.

There are also numerous tiny white particles in the photographs which are presumed to be lipid nanoparticles (LNP). The delicate mRNA fragments from Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are encased in LNP, which serves to protect the mRNA from disintegrating before it can do its job in our bodies. Pfizer conducted a biodistribution study where they injected rats with bioluminescent RNA-encapsulated LNP and found that the LNP had traveled not only beyond the injection site, but throughout the circulatory and immune systems, and had accumulated in virtually every organ in the body.

Meanwhile, Spain and Russia are reportedly advising citizens to avoid air travel if they have been vaccinated for COVID-19. It’s common knowledge that flying frequently, especially on long-distance international flights, can cause blood clots, but talk about mixed signals! What’s next? Non-vaccination passports? The takeaway here ought to be that whether or not someone gets vaccinated should be a personal decision and that the practice of forcing people, especially students and younger adults, to get vaccinated, should be abandoned.

Image: Pixabay

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