Did Democrats steal Orange County?

Dov Fischer at the American Spectator makes an interesting case for what looks like fraud in the Democrats' unexpected sweep of all Orange County congressional seats.

So here is what happened.  All these Republicans Congressional candidates in Orange County and in other parts of the People's Democratic Republic of California (PDRC) came out of election night as winners.  Two-term representative Mimi Walters in the 45th Congressional District. Young Kim, an appealing newcomer to Congress of Korean-American heritage.  Others.  And then, each day, as more and more provisional and other ballots kept emerging in the California count, the Republican leads dwindled.  But you had your eyes on the red card – the red states of Florida and Georgia.

All the election lawyers flew to the red states.  The media.  The focus.  Rick Scott was ahead by a gazillion votes, then fifty thousand-ish, then thirty thousand-ish, then fifteen-thousand-ish, until he finally called in the cavalry and filed a federal lawsuit.  Suddenly, with judges in the game, his and DeSantis's leads stopped dwindling, and Americans learned to our bemusement that Brenda Snipes still is not in jail.  We became eagle-eye focused on Broward County, Palm Beach County, the craziness next door in peach country.  And meanwhile more Congressional ballots kept showing up in the Golden State each day, getting counted in the PDRC.

It's an interesting circumstantial case, because it was funny how so many "found" ballots showed up for so many House seats after the election was done, with all of them favoring the same party, which just happened to be the direction of the one-party state that was counting the ballots.  Funnier still, it's amazing how all of those found ballots, in each and every case, amounted to just enough to tip the congressional seat to the Democrats.  The coincidences seem just a little too strong. 

Fischer is right that all of the press attention seemed to be on the east coast, where judges were brought in to restore order.  There were no such challenges of that kind in California.

In fact, the strongest of the Orange County Republicans, Young Kim, who had a large-margin three-point victory on election night, same as Democrat Katie Hill, who defeated Republican Steve Knight uphill in the nearby Santa Clarita vicinity, somehow lost that entire lead in the continuous counting, while Hill's margin by contrast didn't make a dent.  Funnier still, the newspapers, though they insisted that 100% of the votes were counted, never acknowledged that Young Kim had won when it seemed as though she had on election night.  It was like some kind of fix was in.

One other thing that makes me suspicious is that the secretary of state, Alex Padilla, pretty well asked voters to certify only that they were residents of the state on the mail-in ballot form, not that they were citizens.  Orange County is absolutely loaded with illegals as far down as San Juan Capistrano, and that is a fairly recent development.  Combine it with the Latino machine that runs politics in those parts, and one can only surmise that not every vote was cast by a citizen.  There's other O.C.-specific cause for suspicion: the place is very conservative historically, and there were recent protests about homeless-dumping in Irvine ahead of the election, something that would normally lead fired up voters around the area to vote for Republicans.

All the same, there are forces that buffet against blanket calls of fraud.  Orange County has urbanized significantly, which usually means more Democrats.  What's more, President Trump's stance against free trade in these parts is a negative.  Also, the tax cut took away a critical mortgage tax deduction for high-value homeowners in an area where all property values have gone up, so many people did not benefit or feel they benefited from the big Trump tax cut.  Darrell Issa, recall, cast a vote against the tax cut precisely because of this issue.  My own comparable-to-O.C. neighborhood in San Diego 50 miles away has gone light blue from solid red in voting patterns, and that is a function of house values going up.  From what I have observed, virtually only Asian buyers with high savings are able to afford them.  Those are the only new people in the old and settled neighborhood I have seen.  Such voters often vote Democrat, which would explain the blue here, although someone like Kim in her part of the O.C. was an open invitation to consider a Republican.

Kim herself argued earlier in a tweet that found ballots ought to reflect proportional voting patterns.

She has since conceded to her Democratic opponent and called for unity in what must be a bitter loss.  No word about finding out about that proportionality, which suggests either that she is throwing up her hands at her powerlessness, or else she has somehow been convinced the whole thing was fair.

But if it wasn't fair, there are a whole lot of voters who were cheated – the majority, in fact – and if they were cheated, they shouldn't stand for it.  They need an army of tough lawyers to sort the mess out; they need investigative undercover journalists such as James O'Keefe to expose the problem the Democrats don't want us to see; and above all, they need public protests and pressure.  No sign of that now, so the result is rather unsettling.

Dov Fischer at the American Spectator makes an interesting case for what looks like fraud in the Democrats' unexpected sweep of all Orange County congressional seats.

So here is what happened.  All these Republicans Congressional candidates in Orange County and in other parts of the People's Democratic Republic of California (PDRC) came out of election night as winners.  Two-term representative Mimi Walters in the 45th Congressional District. Young Kim, an appealing newcomer to Congress of Korean-American heritage.  Others.  And then, each day, as more and more provisional and other ballots kept emerging in the California count, the Republican leads dwindled.  But you had your eyes on the red card – the red states of Florida and Georgia.

All the election lawyers flew to the red states.  The media.  The focus.  Rick Scott was ahead by a gazillion votes, then fifty thousand-ish, then thirty thousand-ish, then fifteen-thousand-ish, until he finally called in the cavalry and filed a federal lawsuit.  Suddenly, with judges in the game, his and DeSantis's leads stopped dwindling, and Americans learned to our bemusement that Brenda Snipes still is not in jail.  We became eagle-eye focused on Broward County, Palm Beach County, the craziness next door in peach country.  And meanwhile more Congressional ballots kept showing up in the Golden State each day, getting counted in the PDRC.

It's an interesting circumstantial case, because it was funny how so many "found" ballots showed up for so many House seats after the election was done, with all of them favoring the same party, which just happened to be the direction of the one-party state that was counting the ballots.  Funnier still, it's amazing how all of those found ballots, in each and every case, amounted to just enough to tip the congressional seat to the Democrats.  The coincidences seem just a little too strong. 

Fischer is right that all of the press attention seemed to be on the east coast, where judges were brought in to restore order.  There were no such challenges of that kind in California.

In fact, the strongest of the Orange County Republicans, Young Kim, who had a large-margin three-point victory on election night, same as Democrat Katie Hill, who defeated Republican Steve Knight uphill in the nearby Santa Clarita vicinity, somehow lost that entire lead in the continuous counting, while Hill's margin by contrast didn't make a dent.  Funnier still, the newspapers, though they insisted that 100% of the votes were counted, never acknowledged that Young Kim had won when it seemed as though she had on election night.  It was like some kind of fix was in.

One other thing that makes me suspicious is that the secretary of state, Alex Padilla, pretty well asked voters to certify only that they were residents of the state on the mail-in ballot form, not that they were citizens.  Orange County is absolutely loaded with illegals as far down as San Juan Capistrano, and that is a fairly recent development.  Combine it with the Latino machine that runs politics in those parts, and one can only surmise that not every vote was cast by a citizen.  There's other O.C.-specific cause for suspicion: the place is very conservative historically, and there were recent protests about homeless-dumping in Irvine ahead of the election, something that would normally lead fired up voters around the area to vote for Republicans.

All the same, there are forces that buffet against blanket calls of fraud.  Orange County has urbanized significantly, which usually means more Democrats.  What's more, President Trump's stance against free trade in these parts is a negative.  Also, the tax cut took away a critical mortgage tax deduction for high-value homeowners in an area where all property values have gone up, so many people did not benefit or feel they benefited from the big Trump tax cut.  Darrell Issa, recall, cast a vote against the tax cut precisely because of this issue.  My own comparable-to-O.C. neighborhood in San Diego 50 miles away has gone light blue from solid red in voting patterns, and that is a function of house values going up.  From what I have observed, virtually only Asian buyers with high savings are able to afford them.  Those are the only new people in the old and settled neighborhood I have seen.  Such voters often vote Democrat, which would explain the blue here, although someone like Kim in her part of the O.C. was an open invitation to consider a Republican.

Kim herself argued earlier in a tweet that found ballots ought to reflect proportional voting patterns.

She has since conceded to her Democratic opponent and called for unity in what must be a bitter loss.  No word about finding out about that proportionality, which suggests either that she is throwing up her hands at her powerlessness, or else she has somehow been convinced the whole thing was fair.

But if it wasn't fair, there are a whole lot of voters who were cheated – the majority, in fact – and if they were cheated, they shouldn't stand for it.  They need an army of tough lawyers to sort the mess out; they need investigative undercover journalists such as James O'Keefe to expose the problem the Democrats don't want us to see; and above all, they need public protests and pressure.  No sign of that now, so the result is rather unsettling.