Funny business in GOP congressional winner Young Kim's sudden loss in the recount?

California congressional nominee Young Kim was hailed as the winner with about a three-point margin of victory over her Democratic opponent, Gil Cisneros on election night, with the Associated Press and others reporting 100% of the precincts counted. The Asian and immigrant presses celebrated, and Kim was pictured and seated with the congressional class of 2018 official portrait.

But then something funny happened: She apparently lost last night, as somehow, more votes were counted, and somehow, nearly all of them went for the Democrat, leaving him with a 3,020 surplus.

To her credit, she issued an angry warning a few days earlier:

 

 

She hasn't said anything since.

She makes three good points: That the Cisneros campaign had been rebuked by a judge for ballot tampering and poll worker intimidation, which ought to trigger far more investigative attention than it's gotten, because that's the real thing as far as fraud goes.

Second, she points out that the additonal votes counted, which must be mail-in or provisional ballots that somehow didn't get counted in the midterm aftermath, ought to be statistically similar to the votes that already were counted. She could be right on that, given that she had obvious majority support from the Asian-American community and among the homeowners and successful legal immigrants who made up her political base in Riverside and Orange counties. It was, after all, the congressional seat held by beloved GOP congressman Rep. Ed Royce, where she had been his top aide and had his hearty endorsement. And she had a very large lead on election night.

Third, she emphasizes that she wants ever legal ballot counted - which is an issue in this part of the world, given the numbers of illegal immigrants who are pressured into voting, given the 2% or 3% voter turnout seen in nearby areas, and the Sacramento machine is doing all it can to get more of them to vote, legally or not.

Cisneros probably had the edge in the illegal immigrant zones of Los Angeles, traditionally an area of low voter turnout, and among the Trump haters. The part of Los Angeles County that made up his base seemed to be a smaller part, at least geographically and likely population-wise of the overall district.

Do I think he could have won? Possibly. All of Orange County flipped to blue with this midterm, and factors such as illegal immigration (and its champions), urbanization, media bias, and the fact that homeowners lost key tax deductions in the big congressional tax cut of last year may have had something to do with it.

And do I think political organization might have had something to do with it? Yes, that, too. Cisneros comes from a dirty political machine in California (Here is how they operate) and he has been known to employ muscle and money to make problems go away, given that he won a $266 million lottery, and bought a house in his district just a year ago just to run for the congressional seat. As I wrote earlier, wondering why the press was ignoring Young Kim's obvious victory, here is Cisneros in action:

Uses money to buy influence? Check. Uses money to make problems go away? Check. Enough money to get the Democrats to take his side and use their muscle to defend him while lesser lights go crashing down for the same sort of sex-harrassment bahavior? Check. But unlike Harvey Weinstein, who used his money to buy influence and make sex-harrassment problems go away, Cisneros seems to have had even more political influence with his money, because he able to get a credible sex harassment claim dismissed as a "misunderstanding." And what a coincidence, he has a lot of money for Democrats.

Is the press trying to minimize Kim's victory based on that kind of influence? Call me paranoid, but look how Cisneros does business: Is he going to accept a defeat from an Asian-American woman? By that narrow margin after all the money he spent? Are some "found" ballots going to be found, and all of them go in Cisneros' direction? Somehow that doesn't look right and that could explain why the Democrat-aligned press (but not the ethnic or overseas press) just seems to want to make her go away.

Was the fix already in? Is that why the press ignored her?
 
As for Young Kim, she has national experience and she presents herself wonderfully, and comes off as a solid conservative in ideals, but it's mostly insider experience, not filthy-politics rough-and-tumble. Could she have underestimated how dirty Cisneros's political allies were? Quite possibly, but since the race hasn't been called yet, it may mean she has time to get illegal votes thrown out via the courts. At this point, she's going to have to fight somehow and fight harder, and it's going to take a miracle. What it highlights is that Republicans, particularly Asian American Republicans, must build a fighting machine as tough and bare-knuckled as the Democratic political machine that got Cisneros in.
 
Because there's ample reason for suspicion on this one.

California congressional nominee Young Kim was hailed as the winner with about a three-point margin of victory over her Democratic opponent, Gil Cisneros on election night, with the Associated Press and others reporting 100% of the precincts counted. The Asian and immigrant presses celebrated, and Kim was pictured and seated with the congressional class of 2018 official portrait.

But then something funny happened: She apparently lost last night, as somehow, more votes were counted, and somehow, nearly all of them went for the Democrat, leaving him with a 3,020 surplus.

To her credit, she issued an angry warning a few days earlier:

 

 

She hasn't said anything since.

She makes three good points: That the Cisneros campaign had been rebuked by a judge for ballot tampering and poll worker intimidation, which ought to trigger far more investigative attention than it's gotten, because that's the real thing as far as fraud goes.

Second, she points out that the additonal votes counted, which must be mail-in or provisional ballots that somehow didn't get counted in the midterm aftermath, ought to be statistically similar to the votes that already were counted. She could be right on that, given that she had obvious majority support from the Asian-American community and among the homeowners and successful legal immigrants who made up her political base in Riverside and Orange counties. It was, after all, the congressional seat held by beloved GOP congressman Rep. Ed Royce, where she had been his top aide and had his hearty endorsement. And she had a very large lead on election night.

Third, she emphasizes that she wants ever legal ballot counted - which is an issue in this part of the world, given the numbers of illegal immigrants who are pressured into voting, given the 2% or 3% voter turnout seen in nearby areas, and the Sacramento machine is doing all it can to get more of them to vote, legally or not.

Cisneros probably had the edge in the illegal immigrant zones of Los Angeles, traditionally an area of low voter turnout, and among the Trump haters. The part of Los Angeles County that made up his base seemed to be a smaller part, at least geographically and likely population-wise of the overall district.

Do I think he could have won? Possibly. All of Orange County flipped to blue with this midterm, and factors such as illegal immigration (and its champions), urbanization, media bias, and the fact that homeowners lost key tax deductions in the big congressional tax cut of last year may have had something to do with it.

And do I think political organization might have had something to do with it? Yes, that, too. Cisneros comes from a dirty political machine in California (Here is how they operate) and he has been known to employ muscle and money to make problems go away, given that he won a $266 million lottery, and bought a house in his district just a year ago just to run for the congressional seat. As I wrote earlier, wondering why the press was ignoring Young Kim's obvious victory, here is Cisneros in action:

Uses money to buy influence? Check. Uses money to make problems go away? Check. Enough money to get the Democrats to take his side and use their muscle to defend him while lesser lights go crashing down for the same sort of sex-harrassment bahavior? Check. But unlike Harvey Weinstein, who used his money to buy influence and make sex-harrassment problems go away, Cisneros seems to have had even more political influence with his money, because he able to get a credible sex harassment claim dismissed as a "misunderstanding." And what a coincidence, he has a lot of money for Democrats.

Is the press trying to minimize Kim's victory based on that kind of influence? Call me paranoid, but look how Cisneros does business: Is he going to accept a defeat from an Asian-American woman? By that narrow margin after all the money he spent? Are some "found" ballots going to be found, and all of them go in Cisneros' direction? Somehow that doesn't look right and that could explain why the Democrat-aligned press (but not the ethnic or overseas press) just seems to want to make her go away.

Was the fix already in? Is that why the press ignored her?
 
As for Young Kim, she has national experience and she presents herself wonderfully, and comes off as a solid conservative in ideals, but it's mostly insider experience, not filthy-politics rough-and-tumble. Could she have underestimated how dirty Cisneros's political allies were? Quite possibly, but since the race hasn't been called yet, it may mean she has time to get illegal votes thrown out via the courts. At this point, she's going to have to fight somehow and fight harder, and it's going to take a miracle. What it highlights is that Republicans, particularly Asian American Republicans, must build a fighting machine as tough and bare-knuckled as the Democratic political machine that got Cisneros in.
 
Because there's ample reason for suspicion on this one.