Vaccine propaganda and injection indecision

How do you make decisions in our new internet world?  Most of us just go to Google and type in the question: "Is it safe to get the COVID-19 vaccine?"  The overwhelming response is "Yes!"

Every entry below has the same strangely similar results.  "Side effects are minor and common."  "Side effects are a sign that your vaccine is working properly."

When you visit YouTube and do the same search, again, you see a consistent theme.  "The risk from the COVID outweigh the risks from the vaccines," and "vaccine side effects are actually a good thing."

Check for yourself.

But when you go to an uncensored video website like Bitchute.com or Rumble.com, you see a totally different result: scores of doctors and scientists warning about the danger from the shots, and hundreds of videos from real people who have had horrific side effects from their injections, and most were at extremely low risk for dying from COVID.

You are now presented with a dilemma: "whom do I trust with this potentially life-altering decision?  Which is worse, the disease or the cure?"

Ask yourself, which is more likely in our new world where government officials, news media, and social media have all teamed up to present only one side of an issue? 

When were the first incidences of information and videos being "fact-checked" and removed?  When were the first cases of websites actually being "de-platformed"?  When, in our history, have doctors and scientists been pressured, vilified, and even fired from their jobs for expressing their honest opinions about the most important disease facing our planet?

If you think back, this all started with two subjects: Hunter Biden's ties to China before the 2020 election and the press conference by America's Frontline Doctors talking about effective treatments for COVID.

What happened to the free exchange of ideas and information in the United States?

Whom do you believe: doctors, scientists and real people telling their stories, or Big Tech–controlled media pushing a narrative to "get the vaccine so you can hug your grandmother"?

Why are state governors giving million-dollar lottery tickets in order to get people to take the shot?  If the public believed that the vaccines are safe and effective, then people should be lining up of their own free will.

If you post a comment or video on Facebook about negative vaccine side-effects, your post is "fact-checked" and then deleted, and your account may be closed.

On the other hand, if you knew there were truly safe and effective treatments for COVID, and even safe and effective preventative measures you and your family members could take, the whole issue goes away.  You won't need the shot, and the "Emergency Use Authorization" for the vaccine injections would be no longer valid.

But if you go to your same sources and type "hydroxychloroquine" or "ivermectin," you get a response dated Nov. 9, 2020: "A National Institutes of Health clinical trial evaluating the safety and effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has formally concluded that the drug provides no clinical benefit to hospitalized patients" and "WHO 'strongly' against hydroxychloroquine use for COVID-19."  For ivermectin, you get articles on "Why You Should Not Use Ivermectin to Treat or Prevent COVID-19."

Check for yourself.

If you go to Bitchute with the same question, you are presented with the banned videos from America's Frontline Doctors explaining their experience with using HCQ and ivermectin to prevent and cure COVID.  Rumble shows videos about studies from doctors and scientists about how effective they are.

 

It seems that despite the concerted efforts of Big Tech, people are smart enough to figure out what's going on.  This chart shows a dramatic rise in vaccinations followed by an equally dramatic decrease. 

 

Why have the vaccinations dropped off so sharply?  Could it be that the word is getting out that the vaccines are not as safe as advertised, or that COVID is not much to worry about if you're under 70?

Are you thinking of getting a COVID shot?

Is your teenager being forced to take a shot in order to return to college?

Do you have friends who are on the fence?

A website has been set up that shows videos from real people explaining their stories about side-effects from getting the vaccines.  It also asks people to submit their own stories.  Oddly enough, the website is "1000CovidStories.com."

Watch for yourself and make up your own mind.  Determine for yourself if these stories are fakes or real.  Then ask yourself and your friends, "Is it worth it to risk life-changing and even fatal side effects from a vaccine for a disease that is survived by 99.98% of people under 70?"

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