How will the greenies explain away California?

The Green New Deal, which emanated from the "brilliant"  minds of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her pals, envisions a new America, one completely free of fossil fuels and nuclear power.  It will run, instead, on solar, wind, and water power.

Democrats don't care that green energy is too unreliable to run America or that these "natural" energy alternatives are damaging to the environment (e.g., dead birds, hideous wind and solar farms, and dams and water re-routing).  Both Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are on board with the Green New Deal.  As the campaign progresses, one has to wonder how they're going to explain away the fact that solar power has been the cause of massive energy failures across large swaths of California.

Although it seems a lifetime away, in September, when the Democrat debates were still going strong, NPR put together an article charting where the candidates stood on implementing the Green New Deal:

The Green New Deal was introduced as a nonbinding resolution in Congress, setting forth ambitious goals and policy ideas for fighting climate change, by New York Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Ed Markey. The Green New Deal has set the tone for the climate change conversation in the Democratic primary. Below, we have separated out the candidates who have backed the policy, those whose stance is unclear and those who have voiced opposition. Being listed as a supporter, however, does not indicate support for any specific policy, as the Green New Deal is a set of goals and priorities.

Both Biden and Harris said "yes" to the Green New Deal.  The NPR report continues:

Joe Biden

On his website, Biden calls the Green New Deal "a crucial framework for meeting the climate challenges we face." (Source: campaign website)

[snip]

Kamala Harris

Harris co-sponsored the Green New Deal in the Senate. (Source: Congress.gov)

It's questionable at this point whether people in California under the aegis of PG&E (roughly two thirds of California) still feel as positive as they once did about the Green New Deal.  Yesterday, I wrote about the way in which large parts of California are functioning like a third-world country, with continuous power outages.  I also noted that one of the main problems with the energy supply was solar power failures.

Even the local media are now realizing that there's a problem and the problem is something humankind has known since they parted ways with the apes: putting all one's faith in Mother Nature's whims is not a reliable way to produce energy:

Rolling blackouts that cut power to hundreds of thousands of Californians this week during a historic heat wave have shocked and angered residents from the Bay Area to Southern California.

But last fall, top officials at California's power grid operator ominously warned that electricity shortages were likely as soon as 2020 during a big Western heat wave. The reason: The state's historic shift away from fossil fuels such as natural gas, which provide consistent power, toward cleaner sources such as solar and wind energy, which rise and fall with the weather and the sun.

With less reliable energy supplies, they say the power grid has become more difficult to operate and more at risk of blackouts, calling it a "most urgent issue" that "really needs timely attention."

There are ways to fix the problem, they and outside energy experts note, and still expand renewable energy to reduce air pollution and address climate change.

But the crisis — the first rolling blackouts on California's power grid since 2001 — has exposed a dangerous vulnerability. Not only are millions of people who are working from home during the coronavirus pandemic inconvenienced, but power shutoffs endanger public health, particularly elderly residents who can fall ill or die from heat stroke.

While 2020 has been a difficult year, it's had one major virtue: it has revealed to anyone paying attention what America will look as though if we trade Donald Trump in for the Democrat package.  Within a short time, America will be a violent, racist, broken third-world country.  And if you don't believe me, look at every blue city and state in America in 2020.  That's your future under the Democrats.

Image: Part of the 354 MW Solar Energy Generating Systems (SEGS) parabolic trough solar complex in northern San Bernardino County, California, by the Bureau of Land Management, public domain.

The Green New Deal, which emanated from the "brilliant"  minds of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her pals, envisions a new America, one completely free of fossil fuels and nuclear power.  It will run, instead, on solar, wind, and water power.

Democrats don't care that green energy is too unreliable to run America or that these "natural" energy alternatives are damaging to the environment (e.g., dead birds, hideous wind and solar farms, and dams and water re-routing).  Both Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are on board with the Green New Deal.  As the campaign progresses, one has to wonder how they're going to explain away the fact that solar power has been the cause of massive energy failures across large swaths of California.

Although it seems a lifetime away, in September, when the Democrat debates were still going strong, NPR put together an article charting where the candidates stood on implementing the Green New Deal:

The Green New Deal was introduced as a nonbinding resolution in Congress, setting forth ambitious goals and policy ideas for fighting climate change, by New York Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Ed Markey. The Green New Deal has set the tone for the climate change conversation in the Democratic primary. Below, we have separated out the candidates who have backed the policy, those whose stance is unclear and those who have voiced opposition. Being listed as a supporter, however, does not indicate support for any specific policy, as the Green New Deal is a set of goals and priorities.

Both Biden and Harris said "yes" to the Green New Deal.  The NPR report continues:

Joe Biden

On his website, Biden calls the Green New Deal "a crucial framework for meeting the climate challenges we face." (Source: campaign website)

[snip]

Kamala Harris

Harris co-sponsored the Green New Deal in the Senate. (Source: Congress.gov)

It's questionable at this point whether people in California under the aegis of PG&E (roughly two thirds of California) still feel as positive as they once did about the Green New Deal.  Yesterday, I wrote about the way in which large parts of California are functioning like a third-world country, with continuous power outages.  I also noted that one of the main problems with the energy supply was solar power failures.

Even the local media are now realizing that there's a problem and the problem is something humankind has known since they parted ways with the apes: putting all one's faith in Mother Nature's whims is not a reliable way to produce energy:

Rolling blackouts that cut power to hundreds of thousands of Californians this week during a historic heat wave have shocked and angered residents from the Bay Area to Southern California.

But last fall, top officials at California's power grid operator ominously warned that electricity shortages were likely as soon as 2020 during a big Western heat wave. The reason: The state's historic shift away from fossil fuels such as natural gas, which provide consistent power, toward cleaner sources such as solar and wind energy, which rise and fall with the weather and the sun.

With less reliable energy supplies, they say the power grid has become more difficult to operate and more at risk of blackouts, calling it a "most urgent issue" that "really needs timely attention."

There are ways to fix the problem, they and outside energy experts note, and still expand renewable energy to reduce air pollution and address climate change.

But the crisis — the first rolling blackouts on California's power grid since 2001 — has exposed a dangerous vulnerability. Not only are millions of people who are working from home during the coronavirus pandemic inconvenienced, but power shutoffs endanger public health, particularly elderly residents who can fall ill or die from heat stroke.

While 2020 has been a difficult year, it's had one major virtue: it has revealed to anyone paying attention what America will look as though if we trade Donald Trump in for the Democrat package.  Within a short time, America will be a violent, racist, broken third-world country.  And if you don't believe me, look at every blue city and state in America in 2020.  That's your future under the Democrats.

Image: Part of the 354 MW Solar Energy Generating Systems (SEGS) parabolic trough solar complex in northern San Bernardino County, California, by the Bureau of Land Management, public domain.