And the winner is…

There is one big… wait, make that yuuge winner in the sacking of major American cities that has been underway since mobs started with looting Target in Minneapolis and spread all the way to Macy’s Herald Square flagship in Manhattan and Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills.  Scott Adams took to Twitter to spell it out:

 

 

No, this doesn’t mean that Jeff Bezos set up conspiracy to destroy his competition, and no, there isn’t any evidence Amazon is being protected. Their drivers are worried, too:

An Amazon.com Inc. delivery driver in Long Island, New York, was told to abandon his van and call 911 in the event of looting and avoid “high crime” areas. A driver in Chicago encountered a heavy police presence and road closures. In Washington, another driver canceled his shifts for the week after seeing video of an Amazon van in Santa Monica, California, being looted in broad daylight.

The thousands of drivers who deliver Amazon packages around the U.S. are adjusting to civil unrest that has prompted curfews and road closures aimed at quelling riots and looting. It’s the latest test of a decentralized delivery machine made up of companies that hire people to drive blue Amazon-branded vans and independent drivers who use their own vehicles. Already worried about avoiding exposure to Covid-19, many drivers must weigh the risks of navigating around the unrest.

But it doesn’t take a genius (even though Jeff Bezos must be one) to understand that the periodic riots that have devastated inner cities weaken bricks and mortar retail, and that Amazon would benefit when this happens.

But having the owner of the Washington Post profiting from rioters, that newspaper’s coverage of what it euphemizes as “demonstrators” needs to be taken with a grain of salt. That its coverage exactly serves the financial interests of its owner at best is an awkward coincidence. More plausibly, it is now a PR operation for the world’s richest man and should not be regarded as a legitimate news source.  

There is one big… wait, make that yuuge winner in the sacking of major American cities that has been underway since mobs started with looting Target in Minneapolis and spread all the way to Macy’s Herald Square flagship in Manhattan and Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills.  Scott Adams took to Twitter to spell it out:

 

 

No, this doesn’t mean that Jeff Bezos set up conspiracy to destroy his competition, and no, there isn’t any evidence Amazon is being protected. Their drivers are worried, too:

An Amazon.com Inc. delivery driver in Long Island, New York, was told to abandon his van and call 911 in the event of looting and avoid “high crime” areas. A driver in Chicago encountered a heavy police presence and road closures. In Washington, another driver canceled his shifts for the week after seeing video of an Amazon van in Santa Monica, California, being looted in broad daylight.

The thousands of drivers who deliver Amazon packages around the U.S. are adjusting to civil unrest that has prompted curfews and road closures aimed at quelling riots and looting. It’s the latest test of a decentralized delivery machine made up of companies that hire people to drive blue Amazon-branded vans and independent drivers who use their own vehicles. Already worried about avoiding exposure to Covid-19, many drivers must weigh the risks of navigating around the unrest.

But it doesn’t take a genius (even though Jeff Bezos must be one) to understand that the periodic riots that have devastated inner cities weaken bricks and mortar retail, and that Amazon would benefit when this happens.

But having the owner of the Washington Post profiting from rioters, that newspaper’s coverage of what it euphemizes as “demonstrators” needs to be taken with a grain of salt. That its coverage exactly serves the financial interests of its owner at best is an awkward coincidence. More plausibly, it is now a PR operation for the world’s richest man and should not be regarded as a legitimate news source.