Peloton woman and the impeachers

Round and round Peloton woman speedily goes; when she'll come to her senses, nobody knows.

An ad of a husband gifting his slim, attractive wife a Peloton luxury stationary exercise bike, complete with online streaming classes and more, "The Gift That Gives Back," began airing a few weeks ago, generating  nearly eight million views and so many heated opinions — mainly negative — that the YouTube ad's comments section was turned off.  Social commentators and critics — both professional and average citizens — pondered the meaning of the bike's message all over social media.  Following the unpleasant publicity, the stock of its parent company tanked.  Indeed, the controversy surrounding the 30-second ad was so intense that for a while, more people researched the ad than the impeachment circus hearings, although that has since changed, according to Google Trends.

Read what you will into Google Trends linking more people researching an exercise bike than the futile spinning wheels of the impeachment hearings.  But Peloton's stock price has since improved as more people learned about the luxury bike.  The actor portraying the transformed biker has appeared in a widely viewed spoof gin ad, and her career seems to be on an upward trend.  

Meanwhile, potential impeachee President Donald J. Trump (R) seems to be faring equally well.  As reported here the other day, "Trump surging, Dems tanking in the battleground states that will determine the election,"  while a Quinnipiac University poll reveals:

Slightly more than half of all registered voters, 51 percent, think that President Trump should not be impeached and removed from office, while 45 percent say he should be impeached and removed.  This compares to a November 26 poll in which 48 percent of voters said the president should not be impeached, while 45 percent said he should be.  Today's poll is the first time since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the inquiry that more than half of voters say that Trump should not be impeached.

"With Washington in turmoil and House Democrats poised to vote on impeaching the president for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, American voters signal they are slightly more inclined not to impeach than to impeach," Malloy added.

Oh sure, the poll also indicates that former vice president Joe Biden (D) would beat Trump if the election were held today.  But the election is not being held today, and Biden, along with other Democratic candidates, is widely disliked by potential voters.  

Also:

Today, voters give the president his highest score on his handling of the economy since the question was first asked in February of 2017, with 54 percent approving of the way he's handling the economy and 42 percent disapproving.  A similar 57 percent of voters say that they are better off financially today than they were in 2016, while 22 percent say they are worse off and 19 percent volunteered that they are the same.  Voter perception of the economy has improved since October, as 69 percent of voters say the state of the nation's economy is excellent or good, while 30 percent say it is not so good or poor.  In an October 23 poll, 61 percent said the economy was excellent or good, while 36 percent said it was not so good or poor.

What does the Washington drawn out farce have to do with the half-minute Peloton ad?  Spinning wheels on an exercise bike is beneficial for the spinners; spinning wheels for Democratic political gain is harmful for the spinners.  

That makes more sense than the farce in Washington.

Round and round Peloton woman speedily goes; when she'll come to her senses, nobody knows.

An ad of a husband gifting his slim, attractive wife a Peloton luxury stationary exercise bike, complete with online streaming classes and more, "The Gift That Gives Back," began airing a few weeks ago, generating  nearly eight million views and so many heated opinions — mainly negative — that the YouTube ad's comments section was turned off.  Social commentators and critics — both professional and average citizens — pondered the meaning of the bike's message all over social media.  Following the unpleasant publicity, the stock of its parent company tanked.  Indeed, the controversy surrounding the 30-second ad was so intense that for a while, more people researched the ad than the impeachment circus hearings, although that has since changed, according to Google Trends.

Read what you will into Google Trends linking more people researching an exercise bike than the futile spinning wheels of the impeachment hearings.  But Peloton's stock price has since improved as more people learned about the luxury bike.  The actor portraying the transformed biker has appeared in a widely viewed spoof gin ad, and her career seems to be on an upward trend.  

Meanwhile, potential impeachee President Donald J. Trump (R) seems to be faring equally well.  As reported here the other day, "Trump surging, Dems tanking in the battleground states that will determine the election,"  while a Quinnipiac University poll reveals:

Slightly more than half of all registered voters, 51 percent, think that President Trump should not be impeached and removed from office, while 45 percent say he should be impeached and removed.  This compares to a November 26 poll in which 48 percent of voters said the president should not be impeached, while 45 percent said he should be.  Today's poll is the first time since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the inquiry that more than half of voters say that Trump should not be impeached.

"With Washington in turmoil and House Democrats poised to vote on impeaching the president for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, American voters signal they are slightly more inclined not to impeach than to impeach," Malloy added.

Oh sure, the poll also indicates that former vice president Joe Biden (D) would beat Trump if the election were held today.  But the election is not being held today, and Biden, along with other Democratic candidates, is widely disliked by potential voters.  

Also:

Today, voters give the president his highest score on his handling of the economy since the question was first asked in February of 2017, with 54 percent approving of the way he's handling the economy and 42 percent disapproving.  A similar 57 percent of voters say that they are better off financially today than they were in 2016, while 22 percent say they are worse off and 19 percent volunteered that they are the same.  Voter perception of the economy has improved since October, as 69 percent of voters say the state of the nation's economy is excellent or good, while 30 percent say it is not so good or poor.  In an October 23 poll, 61 percent said the economy was excellent or good, while 36 percent said it was not so good or poor.

What does the Washington drawn out farce have to do with the half-minute Peloton ad?  Spinning wheels on an exercise bike is beneficial for the spinners; spinning wheels for Democratic political gain is harmful for the spinners.  

That makes more sense than the farce in Washington.