Angela Merkel pulls a Hillary

It hasn't receive much notice but last week German Chancellor Angela Merkel put on a performance reminiscent of Hillary Clinton in her 2016 campaign.

Standing beside the president of Ukraine in Berlin, Merkel started to shake uncontrollably. She was obviously in distress and looked as if she was struggling to stay upright.

Afterwards Ms. Merkel attributed this episode to dehydration. It's summer-time after all.

Merkel has been chancellor for over 14 years. During that time, she has faced many stressful situations, and now is bearing the brunt of her disastrous immigration policy. The Christian Democrat Party has lost so much confidence in her that she announced she would not stand for reelection as its party leader come December.

Adding to the chancellor's misery were three polls last week showing the radical Greens have replaced Merkel's Christian Democrats as the most popular party in Germany.

On top of this, there's another cloud hanging over Europe. That is the possible reelection of Donald Trump. Should happen, the complaints the president has been making about the European trade, lack of NATO funding, and German support of Iran will be ramped up to painful levels. Trump will be after tangible results, not just talk and empty promises.

Could all this be taking a toll on this 64-year old, over-weight woman's physical health as well as her political career? How could it not?

This matters because Germany is the most powerful country in Europe and de facto leader of the European Union. What happens in Berlin does not stay in Berlin. If Merkel becomes incapacitated for any reason while still in office, Germany could slide into political turmoil giving a boost to the left-wing Greens and right wing Alternative fur Deutschland (AfD) as they fight for power with the traditional parties.

The last thing Europe needs is more uncertainty. But that is something Europe is not going to able to avoid even if Merkel stays healthy and can finish her term as chancellor in 2021. If she can't, the situation gets all the worse.

Graphic credit: YouTube screen grab (cropped)

It hasn't receive much notice but last week German Chancellor Angela Merkel put on a performance reminiscent of Hillary Clinton in her 2016 campaign.

Standing beside the president of Ukraine in Berlin, Merkel started to shake uncontrollably. She was obviously in distress and looked as if she was struggling to stay upright.

Afterwards Ms. Merkel attributed this episode to dehydration. It's summer-time after all.

Merkel has been chancellor for over 14 years. During that time, she has faced many stressful situations, and now is bearing the brunt of her disastrous immigration policy. The Christian Democrat Party has lost so much confidence in her that she announced she would not stand for reelection as its party leader come December.

Adding to the chancellor's misery were three polls last week showing the radical Greens have replaced Merkel's Christian Democrats as the most popular party in Germany.

On top of this, there's another cloud hanging over Europe. That is the possible reelection of Donald Trump. Should happen, the complaints the president has been making about the European trade, lack of NATO funding, and German support of Iran will be ramped up to painful levels. Trump will be after tangible results, not just talk and empty promises.

Could all this be taking a toll on this 64-year old, over-weight woman's physical health as well as her political career? How could it not?

This matters because Germany is the most powerful country in Europe and de facto leader of the European Union. What happens in Berlin does not stay in Berlin. If Merkel becomes incapacitated for any reason while still in office, Germany could slide into political turmoil giving a boost to the left-wing Greens and right wing Alternative fur Deutschland (AfD) as they fight for power with the traditional parties.

The last thing Europe needs is more uncertainty. But that is something Europe is not going to able to avoid even if Merkel stays healthy and can finish her term as chancellor in 2021. If she can't, the situation gets all the worse.

Graphic credit: YouTube screen grab (cropped)