Amy Klobuchar's 'please clap' moment

Her campaign floundering, Sen. Amy Klobuchar got herself into a telling moment, advising her audience to applaud for her.

Apparently, she didn't even have a few cheerleaders among the campaign operatives to get the clapping started. Here's the New York Post's report:

Presidential hopeful Amy Klobuchar had her own “please clap” moment during a CNN town hall event on Tuesday night when she told an audience that they were “supposed to cheer.”

The Democratic senator from Minnesota was asked how she could win back supporters of President Trump from the heartland when she made the plea that recalled a moment from the 2016 Republican primaries when former Florida governor Jeb Bush asked an audience to “please clap.”

“And every single time I have won, I have won every single congressional district in my state — including Michele Bachmann’s, OK. That’s when you guys are supposed to cheer, OK?” Klobuchar told the crowd.

You know it's bad when a politician has to ask voters for some applause.

One thing stands out here, though. Klobuchar has already drawn a forest of bad press for her hellish behavior toward her staff. She's an ex-prosecutor who's absorbed a certain nastiness associated with the accusatory trade, and her staff turnover has gotten to be the one thing that distinguishes her from her Democratic presidential campaign rivals. Like them, she's a lockstep socialist, meaning she favors lots of coercion of constituents by the state. Her behavior suggests she likes the coercion part best.

So now she's telling her audiences, in that very accusatory way, that "you guys are supposed to cheer, O.K.?" 

She doesn't plead around nicely, the way Jeb Bush once did, she scolds orders. And she scolds to buttress herself, not to lift up the people. So much for Minnesota Nice. 

One more reason why no one should want to elect this person to office and probably won't. Time to put her campaign on death-watch, alongside that of Elizabeth Warren. 

Image credit: Lorie Schaull, via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

Her campaign floundering, Sen. Amy Klobuchar got herself into a telling moment, advising her audience to applaud for her.

Apparently, she didn't even have a few cheerleaders among the campaign operatives to get the clapping started. Here's the New York Post's report:

Presidential hopeful Amy Klobuchar had her own “please clap” moment during a CNN town hall event on Tuesday night when she told an audience that they were “supposed to cheer.”

The Democratic senator from Minnesota was asked how she could win back supporters of President Trump from the heartland when she made the plea that recalled a moment from the 2016 Republican primaries when former Florida governor Jeb Bush asked an audience to “please clap.”

“And every single time I have won, I have won every single congressional district in my state — including Michele Bachmann’s, OK. That’s when you guys are supposed to cheer, OK?” Klobuchar told the crowd.

You know it's bad when a politician has to ask voters for some applause.

One thing stands out here, though. Klobuchar has already drawn a forest of bad press for her hellish behavior toward her staff. She's an ex-prosecutor who's absorbed a certain nastiness associated with the accusatory trade, and her staff turnover has gotten to be the one thing that distinguishes her from her Democratic presidential campaign rivals. Like them, she's a lockstep socialist, meaning she favors lots of coercion of constituents by the state. Her behavior suggests she likes the coercion part best.

So now she's telling her audiences, in that very accusatory way, that "you guys are supposed to cheer, O.K.?" 

She doesn't plead around nicely, the way Jeb Bush once did, she scolds orders. And she scolds to buttress herself, not to lift up the people. So much for Minnesota Nice. 

One more reason why no one should want to elect this person to office and probably won't. Time to put her campaign on death-watch, alongside that of Elizabeth Warren. 

Image credit: Lorie Schaull, via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0