Predatory men vs. predatory women: A double standard?

Are men convicted of certain sex crimes given harsher sentences than women convicted of certain sex crimes?  It seems that way.

Case in point: In 2017, Ronald Godby, a former Northwestern University police officer, pleaded guilty to the manufacture and possession of child pornography and was sentenced to four years in prison.  In addition, he had to register for life as a sex offender.  Godby had taken explicit photos of two underage girls and sent a lewd photo via social media to one of his victims.

That was a just punishment; Godby got what he deserved.

Fast-forward to September 2018.

A 30-year-old female teacher in New York City, Dori Myers, who committed sex acts with a 14-year-old male student on multiple occasions, "will not only avoid prison time but could potentially teach again, under the terms of her plea agreement," according to LifeSiteNews.com.

Myers was given ten years' probation and has to register as a level one sex offender, which won't be "listed on the public directory."

Prosecutors had asked for two years in prison and revocation of Myers' teaching certificate.  But while she was fired after her guilty plea and Education Department spokesman Doug Cohen says she is 'not eligible to work in New York City schools again,' the light sentence leaves open the possibility of her becoming a teacher again elsewhere.

Myers's punishment is little more than a slap on the wrist.  No jail time and the possibility of teaching elsewhere?

"It shows how insignificant many courts view sexual abuse committed by women," said investigator and child advocate Thomas R. Hampson, founder of the Truth Alliance Foundation.

Why do the courts seem to go easy on predatory women?

"I think it's because they misunderstand abuse," Hampson said.  "Men on girls they think is forcible.  Men on boys, usually seen as forcible.  Women on girls, motherly.  Women on boys, the boys are lucky.  That seems to be the view.  The term 'sexual exploitation' is more accurate than 'sexual abuse.'" 

Hampson also said incidents of this type show that women are becoming more predatory.

Again, it seems that way.

However, I doubt you'll see the left clamoring for equal sentencing in sex crimes for women and men.  Nor will they complain about men who sexually exploit underage girls by taking them to Planned Parenthood for abortions.

Are men convicted of certain sex crimes given harsher sentences than women convicted of certain sex crimes?  It seems that way.

Case in point: In 2017, Ronald Godby, a former Northwestern University police officer, pleaded guilty to the manufacture and possession of child pornography and was sentenced to four years in prison.  In addition, he had to register for life as a sex offender.  Godby had taken explicit photos of two underage girls and sent a lewd photo via social media to one of his victims.

That was a just punishment; Godby got what he deserved.

Fast-forward to September 2018.

A 30-year-old female teacher in New York City, Dori Myers, who committed sex acts with a 14-year-old male student on multiple occasions, "will not only avoid prison time but could potentially teach again, under the terms of her plea agreement," according to LifeSiteNews.com.

Myers was given ten years' probation and has to register as a level one sex offender, which won't be "listed on the public directory."

Prosecutors had asked for two years in prison and revocation of Myers' teaching certificate.  But while she was fired after her guilty plea and Education Department spokesman Doug Cohen says she is 'not eligible to work in New York City schools again,' the light sentence leaves open the possibility of her becoming a teacher again elsewhere.

Myers's punishment is little more than a slap on the wrist.  No jail time and the possibility of teaching elsewhere?

"It shows how insignificant many courts view sexual abuse committed by women," said investigator and child advocate Thomas R. Hampson, founder of the Truth Alliance Foundation.

Why do the courts seem to go easy on predatory women?

"I think it's because they misunderstand abuse," Hampson said.  "Men on girls they think is forcible.  Men on boys, usually seen as forcible.  Women on girls, motherly.  Women on boys, the boys are lucky.  That seems to be the view.  The term 'sexual exploitation' is more accurate than 'sexual abuse.'" 

Hampson also said incidents of this type show that women are becoming more predatory.

Again, it seems that way.

However, I doubt you'll see the left clamoring for equal sentencing in sex crimes for women and men.  Nor will they complain about men who sexually exploit underage girls by taking them to Planned Parenthood for abortions.