'CNN sucks': A nice change of pace

Hysteria over "CNN sucks" is ludicrous.  Yes, it is a breach in the decorum historically expected of presidents that Trump is leading the chant, but I for one think stripping the presidency and politics in general of the false façade of respectability is refreshing.  We have too long given adoration and respect to vile creatures who ascend to office on the backs of sophistry and lies, only to be betrayed to the duplicitous snakes they serve: the corrupt "corporate agenda served by establishment politicians."  The quoted words are those of Noam Chomsky, who correctly observed that both parties serve the same interests.

This country is, perhaps, too recently deferential to royalty, and we have hopefully and naïvely instilled in our elected representatives an imprimatur of respectability and honesty that is scarcely deserved.  Presidents, politicians, pundits, and press have become royalty, living lives much removed from the lowly, unsophisticated rubes who struggle to understand the sanctity of their calling and mission.  The arrogance of these supposed intellectuals drips from their mendacious mouths as they preach to us who and what we are, what we need, and how they serve our need for order.  Trump, and those who elected him, have little respect for these characters.

Of course CNN sucks.  So does Fox News.  So do the politicians who ban straws but license crime, who recklessly spend billions and grumble over pennies in higher wages or returned taxes, who build wealth creating nothing but deny wealth to the builders, manufacturers, inventors, and dreamers, the real creators of jobs and wealth.

Presidents, politicians, pundits, and press are not "better."  They are no better people than most of the "deplorables" who elect them or consume their drivel.  They are "us," in nicer clothes, better housing, and a corruptly secured livelihood.  The population, left and right, is only expressing the truth.

It is ironic that Progressives have long demanded deconstruction of these artifices in rhetoric, institutions, and law in the hope that removal will permit real reform of otherwise archaic institutions – to Progressive ends.  I suspect that what really irks many of these same Progressives now is that the party they counted on to hasten these reforms has repeatedly betrayed their cause, and the party they considered the enemy of reform has hurled the boulders of change down the mountain.

Reform no longer serves the Progressives, and it once again threatens them with irrelevance – hopefully the same irrelevance that saw them wither into relative obscurity as an open political force at the beginning of the twentieth century.  The short modern resurgence of Progressive authority, in the form of President Barack Obama, which sought to usher in a new era of hope and change in the form of a return to the nineteenth-century utopian lie of collectivism, is over.  The people in the United States have rejected the lie and rejected global and collective control over our lives, institutions, and laws.

The institutions at the top will be shattered, and those living at the top are now most afraid as they hear the rumble and see the shadow of what is coming.  Those of us in the valleys below will go about our day-to-day lives.  We will wonder at the spectacle and sweep the dust and debris from our homes.  The boulders will rest, and broken political, legal, and financial systems will be reformed, hopefully to better respect freedom and individual rights.  Our lives will go on.  But those who seek to build mansions on the mountain will be changed in the rebuilding.

A president leading a grateful population in a peaceful chant that "CNN sucks" is change.  The people have spoken: "the emperor has no clothes."

Hysteria over "CNN sucks" is ludicrous.  Yes, it is a breach in the decorum historically expected of presidents that Trump is leading the chant, but I for one think stripping the presidency and politics in general of the false façade of respectability is refreshing.  We have too long given adoration and respect to vile creatures who ascend to office on the backs of sophistry and lies, only to be betrayed to the duplicitous snakes they serve: the corrupt "corporate agenda served by establishment politicians."  The quoted words are those of Noam Chomsky, who correctly observed that both parties serve the same interests.

This country is, perhaps, too recently deferential to royalty, and we have hopefully and naïvely instilled in our elected representatives an imprimatur of respectability and honesty that is scarcely deserved.  Presidents, politicians, pundits, and press have become royalty, living lives much removed from the lowly, unsophisticated rubes who struggle to understand the sanctity of their calling and mission.  The arrogance of these supposed intellectuals drips from their mendacious mouths as they preach to us who and what we are, what we need, and how they serve our need for order.  Trump, and those who elected him, have little respect for these characters.

Of course CNN sucks.  So does Fox News.  So do the politicians who ban straws but license crime, who recklessly spend billions and grumble over pennies in higher wages or returned taxes, who build wealth creating nothing but deny wealth to the builders, manufacturers, inventors, and dreamers, the real creators of jobs and wealth.

Presidents, politicians, pundits, and press are not "better."  They are no better people than most of the "deplorables" who elect them or consume their drivel.  They are "us," in nicer clothes, better housing, and a corruptly secured livelihood.  The population, left and right, is only expressing the truth.

It is ironic that Progressives have long demanded deconstruction of these artifices in rhetoric, institutions, and law in the hope that removal will permit real reform of otherwise archaic institutions – to Progressive ends.  I suspect that what really irks many of these same Progressives now is that the party they counted on to hasten these reforms has repeatedly betrayed their cause, and the party they considered the enemy of reform has hurled the boulders of change down the mountain.

Reform no longer serves the Progressives, and it once again threatens them with irrelevance – hopefully the same irrelevance that saw them wither into relative obscurity as an open political force at the beginning of the twentieth century.  The short modern resurgence of Progressive authority, in the form of President Barack Obama, which sought to usher in a new era of hope and change in the form of a return to the nineteenth-century utopian lie of collectivism, is over.  The people in the United States have rejected the lie and rejected global and collective control over our lives, institutions, and laws.

The institutions at the top will be shattered, and those living at the top are now most afraid as they hear the rumble and see the shadow of what is coming.  Those of us in the valleys below will go about our day-to-day lives.  We will wonder at the spectacle and sweep the dust and debris from our homes.  The boulders will rest, and broken political, legal, and financial systems will be reformed, hopefully to better respect freedom and individual rights.  Our lives will go on.  But those who seek to build mansions on the mountain will be changed in the rebuilding.

A president leading a grateful population in a peaceful chant that "CNN sucks" is change.  The people have spoken: "the emperor has no clothes."