Soros gets his comeuppance in Hungary

George Soros isn't popular in his original homeland. The famous leftwing billionaire has devoted much of his hedge-fund fortune to promoting illegal immigration in Hungary, calling it 'civil society' and Hungarian voters gave that a huge vote of no-confidence last Sunday. Hungarian President Viktor Orban declared this week that his Fidesz Party's landslide victory gave him a mandate to enact his very specifically targeted 'Stop Soros' package. Orban declared:

“The reason we submitted this package before the elections is in order to allow the Hungarian voters to cast their vote knowing our intention on this. This has happened and we believe we are mandated by this election to pass this law.”

You can read an English translation of the document on Soros's own website, here.

It states:

The state has a duty to ensure the survival of the nation and to create a solid basis for future generations. It is the primary obligation and also the right of the Hungarian state to protect its citizens and our national culture.

Recognising the emergency, the Hungarian government has spent HUF270 billion from the budget to stop immigration as well as to protect the borders of both Hungary and the EU against migrants.

Any activity intended to promote illegal immigration and to intensify the migratory pressure is against the Hungarian state interest and causes also quantifiable damage to the budget. The migration propaganda assists smuggling organisations and puts illegal border-crossers who deserve a better life at risk.

Therefore a regulation is needed that identifies organisations that support migration and takes action against persons who jeopardise national security.

In other words, any foreign group promoting illegal immigration and foreign invasions needs to be taxed and regulated, given all the money Hungary spends having borders.

Hard to argue that this isn't what the Hungarian people want, given that it was laid out right there plain as day and Hungarians voted for it. The plaintive claims of the press that the election was free but not fair, due to all the government cash spent on advertising may have some merit, but the vote wasn't even close. Fidesz secured two thirds of parliament with Sunday's vote and 49% of the popular vote, the rest divided up among numerous other parties, according to the New York Times. Opponents of the measure were caricatured in billboards as being in Soros's pocket. Here is one example, a screengrab from al-Jazeera:

Screenshot of a Hungarian campaign billboard. Source: al-Jazeera, via Youtube

The Sorosians reply to the United Nations about this legislation showed it was caught on its backfoot, taking umbrage at being labelled a promotor of illegal migration. (They sound a little touchy about that, suggesting that Orban's team is over the target). The Soros document also argued that Hungary has signed conventions on racism and sexism in past treaties as if rejecting illegal immigration werre synomymous with racism and sexism. It wound up its argument by saying every country is obliged to give asylum, and Hungary is a diverse country, something that rings hollow. No wonder voters approved the Orban 'Stop Soros' program.

What's left now is global pearl-clutching at Orban's decisive action against Soros. Hungary has put its foot down, though, and wants to ensure it has a country to come home to. A tide has shifted and the Soros's claims to civil society, which amount to nothing more than sowing chaos, have been called out. The voters have spoken, and it isn't sweet-nothings into Soros's ear.

George Soros isn't popular in his original homeland. The famous leftwing billionaire has devoted much of his hedge-fund fortune to promoting illegal immigration in Hungary, calling it 'civil society' and Hungarian voters gave that a huge vote of no-confidence last Sunday. Hungarian President Viktor Orban declared this week that his Fidesz Party's landslide victory gave him a mandate to enact his very specifically targeted 'Stop Soros' package. Orban declared:

“The reason we submitted this package before the elections is in order to allow the Hungarian voters to cast their vote knowing our intention on this. This has happened and we believe we are mandated by this election to pass this law.”

You can read an English translation of the document on Soros's own website, here.

It states:

The state has a duty to ensure the survival of the nation and to create a solid basis for future generations. It is the primary obligation and also the right of the Hungarian state to protect its citizens and our national culture.

Recognising the emergency, the Hungarian government has spent HUF270 billion from the budget to stop immigration as well as to protect the borders of both Hungary and the EU against migrants.

Any activity intended to promote illegal immigration and to intensify the migratory pressure is against the Hungarian state interest and causes also quantifiable damage to the budget. The migration propaganda assists smuggling organisations and puts illegal border-crossers who deserve a better life at risk.

Therefore a regulation is needed that identifies organisations that support migration and takes action against persons who jeopardise national security.

In other words, any foreign group promoting illegal immigration and foreign invasions needs to be taxed and regulated, given all the money Hungary spends having borders.

Hard to argue that this isn't what the Hungarian people want, given that it was laid out right there plain as day and Hungarians voted for it. The plaintive claims of the press that the election was free but not fair, due to all the government cash spent on advertising may have some merit, but the vote wasn't even close. Fidesz secured two thirds of parliament with Sunday's vote and 49% of the popular vote, the rest divided up among numerous other parties, according to the New York Times. Opponents of the measure were caricatured in billboards as being in Soros's pocket. Here is one example, a screengrab from al-Jazeera:

Screenshot of a Hungarian campaign billboard. Source: al-Jazeera, via Youtube

The Sorosians reply to the United Nations about this legislation showed it was caught on its backfoot, taking umbrage at being labelled a promotor of illegal migration. (They sound a little touchy about that, suggesting that Orban's team is over the target). The Soros document also argued that Hungary has signed conventions on racism and sexism in past treaties as if rejecting illegal immigration werre synomymous with racism and sexism. It wound up its argument by saying every country is obliged to give asylum, and Hungary is a diverse country, something that rings hollow. No wonder voters approved the Orban 'Stop Soros' program.

What's left now is global pearl-clutching at Orban's decisive action against Soros. Hungary has put its foot down, though, and wants to ensure it has a country to come home to. A tide has shifted and the Soros's claims to civil society, which amount to nothing more than sowing chaos, have been called out. The voters have spoken, and it isn't sweet-nothings into Soros's ear.