Nunes subpoena to DOJ yields FISA applications

After flouting the Thursday deadline for producing documents subpoenaed by the House Intelligence Committee related to the FISA surveillance of a member of the Trump campaign, the Department of Justice Friday sent a letter that appears to comply – barely, and in a back-handed manner.  CNN was the first to obtain the letter, which is copied below in its entirety.  This choice of vehicle for the leak likely means that the source is not favorable to Trump.  The letter is signed not even by a principal at the DOJ, but by a secretary on behalf of Stephen E. Boyd, deputy attorney general.

The cave-in is only partial.  Members of both the House and Senate Intelligence Committees will be able to see the FISA applications in their entirety, but only in a room at the Department of Justice, where the normal procedure is to forbid any notes or photographs being made of the classified documents.  

A second concession is the speed-up of delivery of requested documents:

Separately, Justice Department spokesman Ian Prior said the department on Monday will supplement its document production to the House Judiciary Committee by producing another 1,000 pages of materials in response to a subpoena issued by committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte.

Here is the letter:

After flouting the Thursday deadline for producing documents subpoenaed by the House Intelligence Committee related to the FISA surveillance of a member of the Trump campaign, the Department of Justice Friday sent a letter that appears to comply – barely, and in a back-handed manner.  CNN was the first to obtain the letter, which is copied below in its entirety.  This choice of vehicle for the leak likely means that the source is not favorable to Trump.  The letter is signed not even by a principal at the DOJ, but by a secretary on behalf of Stephen E. Boyd, deputy attorney general.

The cave-in is only partial.  Members of both the House and Senate Intelligence Committees will be able to see the FISA applications in their entirety, but only in a room at the Department of Justice, where the normal procedure is to forbid any notes or photographs being made of the classified documents.  

A second concession is the speed-up of delivery of requested documents:

Separately, Justice Department spokesman Ian Prior said the department on Monday will supplement its document production to the House Judiciary Committee by producing another 1,000 pages of materials in response to a subpoena issued by committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte.

Here is the letter: