Cloture rule must be abolished to build the wall

In 2013, Harry Reid changed the Senate rules on cloture to require a majority vote instead of 60 votes to confirm federal judges, except Supreme Court nominees.

Reid did this to confirm Obama appointees.  He did it because Obama wanted his nominees appointed, and Reid supported his president.

Cloture is the procedure to end discussion of a bill to bring it to vote.  It now requires 60 votes to end discussion, usually referred to as filibuster, which will allow 30 hours of discussion instead of endless discussion.  Cloture was first adopted in 1917 to require a two-thirds vote to end discussion.  It was changed in 1975 to 60 votes.

The most famous filibuster was the Democrats' filibuster of 57 days to delay and try to block the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

President Trump ran and won on his promise to build a wall on the southern border.  But he cannot get funding for the wall, and the spending bill he just signed allocates only $1.4 billion for the wall.

Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell are not strong supporters of the wall; it isn't clear they support the wall at all.  Neither fought for or demanded more money for the wall. 

It appears that McConnell opposes changing the 60-vote cloture rule.

The 60-vote requirement is not in the Constitution.  Allowing the minority power to block legislation gives more power to the minority party than intended by our Constitution.  It blocks the will of the voters who elect a majority party in the House, Senate, and presidency, as we now have.  It is a Senate rule that can be changed by the party in power.  Reid changed it to help Obama.  The 60-vote rule will prevent Trump from fully funding the wall to build it, which is the plan of the Democrats.

Even if McConnell wants to remove the 60-vote rule, it is doubtful he can get 51 Republican votes to change the rule.  We still have McCain, Flake, Collins, Murkowski, Sasse, and Graham, who probably will not support the change.

The only hope is for voters to contact their senators, especially the NeverTrump senators like McCain, to change the rule.  Further, we need to elect Republican senators in 2018 who will support the Trump agenda to build the wall and to change the 60-vote rule to majority vote.

In 2013, Harry Reid changed the Senate rules on cloture to require a majority vote instead of 60 votes to confirm federal judges, except Supreme Court nominees.

Reid did this to confirm Obama appointees.  He did it because Obama wanted his nominees appointed, and Reid supported his president.

Cloture is the procedure to end discussion of a bill to bring it to vote.  It now requires 60 votes to end discussion, usually referred to as filibuster, which will allow 30 hours of discussion instead of endless discussion.  Cloture was first adopted in 1917 to require a two-thirds vote to end discussion.  It was changed in 1975 to 60 votes.

The most famous filibuster was the Democrats' filibuster of 57 days to delay and try to block the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

President Trump ran and won on his promise to build a wall on the southern border.  But he cannot get funding for the wall, and the spending bill he just signed allocates only $1.4 billion for the wall.

Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell are not strong supporters of the wall; it isn't clear they support the wall at all.  Neither fought for or demanded more money for the wall. 

It appears that McConnell opposes changing the 60-vote cloture rule.

The 60-vote requirement is not in the Constitution.  Allowing the minority power to block legislation gives more power to the minority party than intended by our Constitution.  It blocks the will of the voters who elect a majority party in the House, Senate, and presidency, as we now have.  It is a Senate rule that can be changed by the party in power.  Reid changed it to help Obama.  The 60-vote rule will prevent Trump from fully funding the wall to build it, which is the plan of the Democrats.

Even if McConnell wants to remove the 60-vote rule, it is doubtful he can get 51 Republican votes to change the rule.  We still have McCain, Flake, Collins, Murkowski, Sasse, and Graham, who probably will not support the change.

The only hope is for voters to contact their senators, especially the NeverTrump senators like McCain, to change the rule.  Further, we need to elect Republican senators in 2018 who will support the Trump agenda to build the wall and to change the 60-vote rule to majority vote.