Why can't the GOP win the tax bill messaging game?

The Democrats are beating the Republicans, as usual, in the tax bill messaging game. 

While the Republicans "fret" and "worry" about the alleged "unpopularity" of the tax cut bill, the Democrats "slam" the bill as the "ultimate fraud," a "boon to the wealthiest Americans," and a move "the GOP will regret." 

Even the Republicans' own teammate says there's "going to be problems" if he doesn't get his way on the final bill.  And another Republican teammate says the House-Senate committee working out the final tax bill is "completely in la la land," publicizing his disagreement with members of the conference committee. 

How's that for GOP messaging?  As the 29-member green eyeshade conference committee piles up the late-night pizza boxes while its members forge ahead on a bill that can make or break the Trump GOP, all the public hears is that the GOP team is in La-La Land.

Yet another Republican teammate holds herself out yet again as the final arbiter on whether the combined tax bill is worthy of her vote – as though the other 51 Republican senators don't have their own priorities, that in the majority of cases includes sending the bill to the president's desk and doesn't include holding the bill hostage to their individual demands. 

And every Democrat from Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer to the Washington Post endlessly repeats the Congressional Budget Office's mantra that "13 million Americans" will be left "without health care"  if the GOP repeals the Obamacare individual mandate as part of the tax bill. 

The Republican message machine would rather fret and worry than endlessly repeat the fact that "6.5 million taxpayers paid $3 billion in Obamacare penalties in 2016" for the privilege of not being forced by the government to buy an unaffordable Obamacare policy.

As for Republicans who "fret" over the unpopularity of the bill, one senator warned that the Republican Party "cannot become identified with the 'country club-big business image.'" 

But F.H. Buckley, writing at usatoday.com about the corporate tax rate cut and the repatriation of trillions in foreign earnings, helps out our week-kneed Republican friends: 

The bill is good news for most middle-class Americans. More important, it's a jobs bill, because it will give firms an incentive to invest in the United States[.] ... There's a worldwide competition for investment dollars and all other things being equal they're going to flow to low-tax countries.

CNBC reports that American firms have left $2.6 trillion in foreign subsidiaries. That amounts to nearly 14% of U.S. GDP. If firms had an incentive to re­invest the money here, think what this would mean for American jobs.

It's all about jobs for Americans.  You have a problem with that?

What if our Republican Senate friend who says there are "going to be problems" stood up in the Senate and said, "It's all about jobs.  You got a problem with that?"  And what if the other 51 Republican senators stood up and said the same thing?

And as for that "boon to the wealthiest Americans," Steve Moore at investors.com suggests one way to improve the GOP tax bill: "Close the George Soros loophole":

George Soros just recently gave $18 billion to his family foundation and the money went in tax free. This is possibly the biggest tax dodge in American history.  ‎Millionaires and billionaires who give money tax-free to private foundations – Gates, Buffet, Zuckerberg, and the rest – should pay capital gains on these assets, then give it to the foundation.

This will raise hundreds of billions of dollars for the government over time and can then lead to a lower capital gains tax for everyone.

As a washingtonexaminer.com editorial puts it regarding wealthy blue-state Democrats faced with bigger tax bills, the "Democrats are all for making the rich pay more as long as it's not their rich" (emphasis original).

Or there is Kyle Smith writing at nypost.com on the tax bill hysteria among blue-state progressives: "Maybe high-income blue-state elites really do worry it's the end of America. But it kind of smells like what they're worried about is themselves."

Our GOP Senate friends could hammer away at those talking points as well.   

Perhaps Wayne Allen Root at reviewjournal.com has the best answer to the socialist naysayers in abject fear of President Trump's economic success, which would only be accelerated by the GOP tax bill:

Well don't look now, but Trump has turned around the U.S. economy in record time. What's happening can be described only as the Trump Miracle.

... Obama said manufacturing jobs were gone forever. For an anti-business socialist such as Obama, they were. For a smart conservative capitalist such as Trump, they came roaring back. In one year. Amazing.

My prediction: Democrats will never defeat Trump. No matter how many "trumped-up charges" they invent. Because as James Carville once said "It's the economy, stupid."

So buck up, Republicans, lose the worry beads, and repeat after me:

It's all about jobs for Americans.  You have a problem with that?

The Democrats are beating the Republicans, as usual, in the tax bill messaging game. 

While the Republicans "fret" and "worry" about the alleged "unpopularity" of the tax cut bill, the Democrats "slam" the bill as the "ultimate fraud," a "boon to the wealthiest Americans," and a move "the GOP will regret." 

Even the Republicans' own teammate says there's "going to be problems" if he doesn't get his way on the final bill.  And another Republican teammate says the House-Senate committee working out the final tax bill is "completely in la la land," publicizing his disagreement with members of the conference committee. 

How's that for GOP messaging?  As the 29-member green eyeshade conference committee piles up the late-night pizza boxes while its members forge ahead on a bill that can make or break the Trump GOP, all the public hears is that the GOP team is in La-La Land.

Yet another Republican teammate holds herself out yet again as the final arbiter on whether the combined tax bill is worthy of her vote – as though the other 51 Republican senators don't have their own priorities, that in the majority of cases includes sending the bill to the president's desk and doesn't include holding the bill hostage to their individual demands. 

And every Democrat from Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer to the Washington Post endlessly repeats the Congressional Budget Office's mantra that "13 million Americans" will be left "without health care"  if the GOP repeals the Obamacare individual mandate as part of the tax bill. 

The Republican message machine would rather fret and worry than endlessly repeat the fact that "6.5 million taxpayers paid $3 billion in Obamacare penalties in 2016" for the privilege of not being forced by the government to buy an unaffordable Obamacare policy.

As for Republicans who "fret" over the unpopularity of the bill, one senator warned that the Republican Party "cannot become identified with the 'country club-big business image.'" 

But F.H. Buckley, writing at usatoday.com about the corporate tax rate cut and the repatriation of trillions in foreign earnings, helps out our week-kneed Republican friends: 

The bill is good news for most middle-class Americans. More important, it's a jobs bill, because it will give firms an incentive to invest in the United States[.] ... There's a worldwide competition for investment dollars and all other things being equal they're going to flow to low-tax countries.

CNBC reports that American firms have left $2.6 trillion in foreign subsidiaries. That amounts to nearly 14% of U.S. GDP. If firms had an incentive to re­invest the money here, think what this would mean for American jobs.

It's all about jobs for Americans.  You have a problem with that?

What if our Republican Senate friend who says there are "going to be problems" stood up in the Senate and said, "It's all about jobs.  You got a problem with that?"  And what if the other 51 Republican senators stood up and said the same thing?

And as for that "boon to the wealthiest Americans," Steve Moore at investors.com suggests one way to improve the GOP tax bill: "Close the George Soros loophole":

George Soros just recently gave $18 billion to his family foundation and the money went in tax free. This is possibly the biggest tax dodge in American history.  ‎Millionaires and billionaires who give money tax-free to private foundations – Gates, Buffet, Zuckerberg, and the rest – should pay capital gains on these assets, then give it to the foundation.

This will raise hundreds of billions of dollars for the government over time and can then lead to a lower capital gains tax for everyone.

As a washingtonexaminer.com editorial puts it regarding wealthy blue-state Democrats faced with bigger tax bills, the "Democrats are all for making the rich pay more as long as it's not their rich" (emphasis original).

Or there is Kyle Smith writing at nypost.com on the tax bill hysteria among blue-state progressives: "Maybe high-income blue-state elites really do worry it's the end of America. But it kind of smells like what they're worried about is themselves."

Our GOP Senate friends could hammer away at those talking points as well.   

Perhaps Wayne Allen Root at reviewjournal.com has the best answer to the socialist naysayers in abject fear of President Trump's economic success, which would only be accelerated by the GOP tax bill:

Well don't look now, but Trump has turned around the U.S. economy in record time. What's happening can be described only as the Trump Miracle.

... Obama said manufacturing jobs were gone forever. For an anti-business socialist such as Obama, they were. For a smart conservative capitalist such as Trump, they came roaring back. In one year. Amazing.

My prediction: Democrats will never defeat Trump. No matter how many "trumped-up charges" they invent. Because as James Carville once said "It's the economy, stupid."

So buck up, Republicans, lose the worry beads, and repeat after me:

It's all about jobs for Americans.  You have a problem with that?