We're not in Kansas anymore, Chelsea

News people inundated Chelsea Clinton with questions she couldn't answer about the $250K Harvey Weinstein contributed to Hillary's campaign, so Chelsea fled.  Poor child's not made of the sterner stuff of Mom and Pop.

Bill and Hill don't get Chelsea, and Chelsea doesn't get Bill and Hill.  Bill and Hill were both bad seeds, born to do evil, to lie and cheat, and do whatever necessary to get their way.  Nobody had to show them, instruct them, lead them; they knew from the day they emerged from their respective mothers' wombs.  What's more, their siblings were all pretty much the same way.

So Hill and Bill didn't get it when Chelsea showed up with no natural instinct for badness.  Chelsea's what the statisticians call a "regression to the mean."  In her case, it means she's more normal than either parent.  She has a conscience, she believes lies, and she's basically innocent, if not necessarily good.  But she doesn't understand her parents because she doesn't have the evil in her that has always inhabited them.

It no doubt dazzles Chelsea that her mother or father can take any question and turn it inside-out with no preparation, on the spur of the moment, sliding easily from truth to lie to invention, weaving things together like storytellers in ways that seem miraculous.

Chelsea interprets this as brilliance because that's what all the liars and sycophants around her parents have always told her it was – you know, the Stephanopouloses and the Carvilles and that crowd.  It never occurs to her simple mind that the people she loves with childlike innocence are not good people.

News people inundated Chelsea Clinton with questions she couldn't answer about the $250K Harvey Weinstein contributed to Hillary's campaign, so Chelsea fled.  Poor child's not made of the sterner stuff of Mom and Pop.

Bill and Hill don't get Chelsea, and Chelsea doesn't get Bill and Hill.  Bill and Hill were both bad seeds, born to do evil, to lie and cheat, and do whatever necessary to get their way.  Nobody had to show them, instruct them, lead them; they knew from the day they emerged from their respective mothers' wombs.  What's more, their siblings were all pretty much the same way.

So Hill and Bill didn't get it when Chelsea showed up with no natural instinct for badness.  Chelsea's what the statisticians call a "regression to the mean."  In her case, it means she's more normal than either parent.  She has a conscience, she believes lies, and she's basically innocent, if not necessarily good.  But she doesn't understand her parents because she doesn't have the evil in her that has always inhabited them.

It no doubt dazzles Chelsea that her mother or father can take any question and turn it inside-out with no preparation, on the spur of the moment, sliding easily from truth to lie to invention, weaving things together like storytellers in ways that seem miraculous.

Chelsea interprets this as brilliance because that's what all the liars and sycophants around her parents have always told her it was – you know, the Stephanopouloses and the Carvilles and that crowd.  It never occurs to her simple mind that the people she loves with childlike innocence are not good people.