Benghazi whistleblower says he's been punished for speaking out

Rick Moran
Nothing you can prove, of course. These things are done with great subtly. An application for assignment mysteriously moves to the bottom of the pile. A phone number is lost. A message to call back disappears.

No one has come out and told Gregory Hicks, the former deputy chief of mission in Libya who testified before Congress about the 9/11 attacks on an American diplomatic facility earlier this year, and spoke out strongly about the administration's lack of response to the attack, that he's being punished for speaking out.

But you'd have to be brain dead not to see that this is exactly what the State Departmnet is doing.

National Review:

"I don't know why I was punished," Hicks said in an interview with ABC's This Week. "I don't know why I was shunted aside, put in a closet if you will."

Hick said he will continue to talk about the attacks because "the American people need to have the story" of what took place that night and the four Americans who were lost in the attacks "should be remembered." He also believes that former Navy SEALS Ty Woods and Glen Doherty, who died eight hours after the initial attack on the diplomatic mission, could have been saved.

While Hicks still remains on staff at the State Department, he has not been reassigned to a post since being called back from Libya. In a statement to This Week, the State Department said Hicks was not removed from Libya as a result of the statements he has made about the Benghazi attacks and it is working on reassigning him.

Yeah - they're "working on it." My eye.

You can bet there will be no official rememberances of the attack on Wednesday, the one year anniversary of the assassination of our ambassador Chris Stevens and the deaths of 3 other Americans. They have become non-people, part of a non-event that really didn't happen, which is why they're not punishing Hicks - even though they are.

Glad we were able to clear that up.

Nothing you can prove, of course. These things are done with great subtly. An application for assignment mysteriously moves to the bottom of the pile. A phone number is lost. A message to call back disappears.

No one has come out and told Gregory Hicks, the former deputy chief of mission in Libya who testified before Congress about the 9/11 attacks on an American diplomatic facility earlier this year, and spoke out strongly about the administration's lack of response to the attack, that he's being punished for speaking out.

But you'd have to be brain dead not to see that this is exactly what the State Departmnet is doing.

National Review:

"I don't know why I was punished," Hicks said in an interview with ABC's This Week. "I don't know why I was shunted aside, put in a closet if you will."

Hick said he will continue to talk about the attacks because "the American people need to have the story" of what took place that night and the four Americans who were lost in the attacks "should be remembered." He also believes that former Navy SEALS Ty Woods and Glen Doherty, who died eight hours after the initial attack on the diplomatic mission, could have been saved.

While Hicks still remains on staff at the State Department, he has not been reassigned to a post since being called back from Libya. In a statement to This Week, the State Department said Hicks was not removed from Libya as a result of the statements he has made about the Benghazi attacks and it is working on reassigning him.

Yeah - they're "working on it." My eye.

You can bet there will be no official rememberances of the attack on Wednesday, the one year anniversary of the assassination of our ambassador Chris Stevens and the deaths of 3 other Americans. They have become non-people, part of a non-event that really didn't happen, which is why they're not punishing Hicks - even though they are.

Glad we were able to clear that up.