Compromise reached on rules controversy

Rick Moran
A potential floor fight over new rules regarding delegate selection at the state level was headed off late Monday night when a compromise was reached between the Romney campaign and the leader of the group looking to defeat the rules changes.

The rules in question would have affected future delegate selection by giving the nominee the right to vet all delegates chosen to attend the convention, and a rule that would require delegations from statewide caucuses and conventions to adhere to the will of the majority who voted when selecting delegates.

ABC News:

Bopp had led a movement to defeat this rule on the convention floor Tuesday.

Instead, Bopp has agreed to compromise language. The RNC Rules Committee will meet Tuesday to approve the replacement language, Bopp told ABC News.

"The leadership of the Republican National Committee and the Romney for President campaign has heard the concerns of the conservative grassroots voices in our party and has crafted an amendment to the Rules adopted on Friday to address these concerns," Bopp wrote in an email to Republican National Committee members. "At the same time, the revised language closes a loophole in our party rules, which previously failed to include a penalty for delegates who break their promise to vote for a particular Presidential candidate as required by state law or state party rules."

Bopp explained the impetus for the proposed change, in the first place, as fear that Ron Paul supporters bound to Mitt Romney would break party rules and instead vote for Paul. The rule sought to prevent that risk at future conventions, Bopp said.

The compromise language simply states that delegates must vote for the candidates to whom they are bound, Bopp said. If not, they'll be kicked out of future conventions and votes will be cast on their behalf.

The deal likely will not, however, allay some concerns of Ron Paul supporter.

The Paul supporters are a wild card at this juncture. Ron Paul refused to endorse Mitt Romney and this may leave the door open for his supporters to roil the floor of the convention. The rule changes were aimed directly at the Paul delegates who created chaos at several state conventions, and will force state parties to adhere to the will of the voters.

Many Paul supporters don't care if Obama wins a second term. Their only interest in the presidential race was to see their man win. Now that this isn't possible, trying to destroy Mitt Romney's convention and present the face of discord and sore losing to the American people is all they have left.



A potential floor fight over new rules regarding delegate selection at the state level was headed off late Monday night when a compromise was reached between the Romney campaign and the leader of the group looking to defeat the rules changes.

The rules in question would have affected future delegate selection by giving the nominee the right to vet all delegates chosen to attend the convention, and a rule that would require delegations from statewide caucuses and conventions to adhere to the will of the majority who voted when selecting delegates.

ABC News:

Bopp had led a movement to defeat this rule on the convention floor Tuesday.

Instead, Bopp has agreed to compromise language. The RNC Rules Committee will meet Tuesday to approve the replacement language, Bopp told ABC News.

"The leadership of the Republican National Committee and the Romney for President campaign has heard the concerns of the conservative grassroots voices in our party and has crafted an amendment to the Rules adopted on Friday to address these concerns," Bopp wrote in an email to Republican National Committee members. "At the same time, the revised language closes a loophole in our party rules, which previously failed to include a penalty for delegates who break their promise to vote for a particular Presidential candidate as required by state law or state party rules."

Bopp explained the impetus for the proposed change, in the first place, as fear that Ron Paul supporters bound to Mitt Romney would break party rules and instead vote for Paul. The rule sought to prevent that risk at future conventions, Bopp said.

The compromise language simply states that delegates must vote for the candidates to whom they are bound, Bopp said. If not, they'll be kicked out of future conventions and votes will be cast on their behalf.

The deal likely will not, however, allay some concerns of Ron Paul supporter.

The Paul supporters are a wild card at this juncture. Ron Paul refused to endorse Mitt Romney and this may leave the door open for his supporters to roil the floor of the convention. The rule changes were aimed directly at the Paul delegates who created chaos at several state conventions, and will force state parties to adhere to the will of the voters.

Many Paul supporters don't care if Obama wins a second term. Their only interest in the presidential race was to see their man win. Now that this isn't possible, trying to destroy Mitt Romney's convention and present the face of discord and sore losing to the American people is all they have left.