A governing class united against the American people

The Washington Generals were, by design, perennial losers to the Harlem Globetrotters.  The Washington Senators were forever the doormat of baseball's American League.  It's strange that destiny should have worked out such a richly symbolic fate for those organizations.

The real-life Washington generals, be they politicians or actual generals, have led the United States into the greatest military debacle of the modern era.  The many obvious lessons were largely lost on the political class after the Vietnam war, and as a result, we're now reliving that catastrophe in Afghanistan, only at an amplified level.

The Washington "senators" share culpability for much of the dissolution that has occurred over the past six decades.  While most of the damage we're seeing in America's fabric is the work of Democrat senators, Republicans seldom have done more than make a pretense of resisting the Democrats' expensive, destructive initiatives.  And at times, they were one of the driving forces behind all the decay.

On those rare occasions when Republicans controlled the government, they could not bring themselves to rid us of all or any of the unconstitutional federal agencies and organizations that now benefit from government largesse.  The Department of Education, the NEA, Planned Parenthood, and NPR, just to name a few of the more obvious candidates for expulsion from the government trough, remain well-fed to this day.  We can now add the FBI, the NSA, and the Capitol Police to the list of irredeemably corrupt operations that deserve to be defunded.  (And never forget John McCain keeping Obamacare alive to spite Trump.)

There are now more than 400 federal government agencies and departments.  A truly constitutional government would leave us with a few dozen at most.  Thanks to the corruption of its sworn defendants, the Constitution that was designed to limit the size and scope of the federal government has resulted in the largest, most bloated, and self-serving government in the history of the world.

For only twelve of the past fifty years have staunch protectors of the American people occupied the Oval Office.  When it came to Ronald Reagan and Donald Trump, it wasn't just the Democrats who opposed them.  Republicans did, too.  President Trump had to deal with Republican retirements that cost him the House and courts that overturned or delayed much of what he tried to accomplish.

He was also the target of endlessly contrived investigations that Republicans never really took a hard line against.  In many cases, Republicans openly supported the investigations.

When we look at the "game" objectively, it seems as if Republicans and Democrats both strive most aggressively not to defend their ideological beliefs and principles, but rather to thwart the will of the American people.  Perhaps that's where the real division exists: the government class, their media enablers, and the coastal elites versus the American people.  The fact that they've now walled themselves off from the rest of the population would certainly tend to support that view.

If Americans were properly represented, the southern border would have been largely shut down forty years ago, and marriage would still involve one man and one woman.  The opposite is now the case — and is the result of those policies having been forced on the American people and a compliant population having learned to live with it.

Our government now decides whether we're fit to leave our homes, whether we should be forced to wear masks, and whether certain medical treatments should be compulsory.  This is a far cry from the God-given rights and liberties the Founders envisioned.

The Washington "Generals" and "Senators," having grown weary of losing and leery of their own constituents, are now attempting to turn their virtually limitless resources on the real enemy: the American people.  Perhaps they've finally realized their only true calling: tyranny.

Image: The United States Capitol by the National Park Service (edited in Pixlr).  Public Domain.

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