When it comes to GOP failings, Tucker Carlson names a name

Tucker Carlson opened Friday night's show with a pointed critique.  The rhetorical question was why the Republican leadership is so disconnected from Republican voters.  One of the reasons, he said, is Frank Luntz.  For decades, Luntz has been giving the GOP leadership its talking points.  The problem is that Luntz is not a conservative; he is a corporate servant, and his points always align with corporate America — and lately, corporate America has been aligning with the woke left.

First, watch the video.  Then get back to me, and we'll talk:

So, you got all that, right?  Frank Luntz is a man who has no loyalty, yet the Republican party leadership is incredibly loyal to him.  He's the one who tells them Republican voters love illegal immigration, want amnesty, and think it's a great idea for the government to take their weapons.

But did you notice how often Tucker said he wasn't attacking Luntz?  Luntz is a great guy.  Luntz is just doing what he does.  (One of the things Luntz did in January was to spend an hour ignorantly attacking Trump from a leftist viewpoint as part of an interview he did for a PBS Frontline show called "Trump's American Carnage" — all while being identified as a "conservative.")

So whom should Tucker be attacking?  He should be attacking the Republican leadership.  Except he didn't.  He mentioned that Luntz is friends with Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the House minority leader, but he didn't name a single other person.

Tucker said the National Republican Congressional Committee, just this past week, invited Luntz to come to their policy summit and tell them what the voters want.  What Tucker didn't say is who was at the NRCC's summit absorbing Luntz's assurances that Republican voters, the same ones who gave Donald Trump a 92% approval rating, nevertheless want the opposite of everything Trump stood for: strong borders, the end of illegal immigration, no amnesty, no DREAMers, no deals with China, no gun control, etc.

Even when Tucker later spoke to a very compelling young man, Pedro Gonzales, who spoke powerfully about the need for voters to rise up against GOP representatives who view them as useful idiots, not once did Gonzales or Tucker name which representatives are the ones parroting Luntz's messages rather than listening to their base.

We can certainly guess at some of the ones who are completely enamored of the Luntz message.  Liz Cheney, Mitt Romney, Adam Kinzinger, Jaime Herrera Beutler, Anthony Gonzales, Peter Meijer, John Katko, Tom Rice, Fred Upton, David Valadao, and Dan Newhouse — all of them voted to impeach Trump.  None of them listened to his base.

But other than that, who was in the room, lapping up the pearls of wisdom dropping from Luntz's lips?

One of the main problems with so much of what goes on today in politics is that no one names names.  We're told that "Republicans did this" or the "leadership did that" or that "some are saying..."

In the same way, when we learn that the FBI raided Rudy Giuliani's home and took everything but the Hunter Biden hard drives with kiddy porn, no news report ever tells who signed off on that warrant.  Why not?

I'm not talking about doxxing people by putting out their home addresses or naming their children.  But shouldn't we know which hitherto faceless civil servants thought it was appropriate to attack the former president's attorney?  And moreover, did so while completely ignoring that the current occupant of the White House has a son who committed a felony by lying on a gun application, who never registered as a foreign agent (the charge leveled against Giuliani), and who — let me say it again — reputedly has child porn on his computer?

It's time that the bureaucrats who control our lives stop being nameless and faceless.  And it's time that the Republicans who think Frank Luntz speaks for the rest of us should stop being nameless, too.

Image: Frank Luntz. YouTube screen grab.

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