The obvious fact everyone is overlooking about the Portland riots

It's a truism in life that, sometimes, it's the most obvious thing that you manage to overlook.  One time, late at night in college, I could not find a pencil that I'd just had.  I picked up books, moved papers.  Checked the floor.  Nothing.  It wasn't until I went to lift my typewriter off the desk and put the pencil in my hand into my mouth so I could use both hands that I suddenly realized that the pencil had been in my hand the whole time.

When it comes to the riots in Portland, there's an obvious fact that the media are overlooking: the protesters don't have to be protesting where they are — in front of the Federal Building.

There are no restrictions in Portland on locations of protests.  They can go anywhere in the city to protest.  There are plenty of parks — over 10,000 acres of them.  There are plenty of other city blocks.  There are 145.09 square miles in Portland.  The Federal Courthouse is on one block.

And there's the obvious point overlooked: the protesters are choosing to be there.  This means that in this situation, they are the aggressors, not the feds.

If a woman defends herself against an aggressive male, is she at fault?  Is she the aggressor?  Or the victim?

The feds are there because, by law, the feds can, do, and need to protect federal buildings that come under attack.  They have a duty to protect federal property.  That's why the feds are there.

So why are the protesters there?  If the protesters truly are "peaceful," and all they want is to peacefully protest, then all they need to do so is go somewhere else.

Here's the thing: a building can't move.  Protesters can.

Walk down the street a few blocks.  Portland has (or used to have) some of the best parks in the nation.  Go have a picnic.  Portland has (or used to have) a beautiful waterfront along the Willamette River.  Get some sun and social distancing.  Enjoy the boats.

Or cross the river.  There's a whole other half of the city just waiting for your attention.

You don't need to be in front of the federal building.  So prove it.  Otherwise, as long as you continue to stay there, your actions speak louder than your words.

You claim it's peaceful.  So move.  Walk away.

Mark Anderson holds an MBA and is all but dissertation in his Doctor of Business Administration.  He hosts I Spy Radio, a conservative talk show in blue Oregon.

It's a truism in life that, sometimes, it's the most obvious thing that you manage to overlook.  One time, late at night in college, I could not find a pencil that I'd just had.  I picked up books, moved papers.  Checked the floor.  Nothing.  It wasn't until I went to lift my typewriter off the desk and put the pencil in my hand into my mouth so I could use both hands that I suddenly realized that the pencil had been in my hand the whole time.

When it comes to the riots in Portland, there's an obvious fact that the media are overlooking: the protesters don't have to be protesting where they are — in front of the Federal Building.

There are no restrictions in Portland on locations of protests.  They can go anywhere in the city to protest.  There are plenty of parks — over 10,000 acres of them.  There are plenty of other city blocks.  There are 145.09 square miles in Portland.  The Federal Courthouse is on one block.

And there's the obvious point overlooked: the protesters are choosing to be there.  This means that in this situation, they are the aggressors, not the feds.

If a woman defends herself against an aggressive male, is she at fault?  Is she the aggressor?  Or the victim?

The feds are there because, by law, the feds can, do, and need to protect federal buildings that come under attack.  They have a duty to protect federal property.  That's why the feds are there.

So why are the protesters there?  If the protesters truly are "peaceful," and all they want is to peacefully protest, then all they need to do so is go somewhere else.

Here's the thing: a building can't move.  Protesters can.

Walk down the street a few blocks.  Portland has (or used to have) some of the best parks in the nation.  Go have a picnic.  Portland has (or used to have) a beautiful waterfront along the Willamette River.  Get some sun and social distancing.  Enjoy the boats.

Or cross the river.  There's a whole other half of the city just waiting for your attention.

You don't need to be in front of the federal building.  So prove it.  Otherwise, as long as you continue to stay there, your actions speak louder than your words.

You claim it's peaceful.  So move.  Walk away.

Mark Anderson holds an MBA and is all but dissertation in his Doctor of Business Administration.  He hosts I Spy Radio, a conservative talk show in blue Oregon.