Interest in Q surges in wake of Twitter ban

Nothing tastes sweeter than forbidden fruit. On July 21st, Twitter announced that it was deleting 7,000 QAnon accounts, limiting the reach of 150,000 others and banning Q-related topics from trending. Immediately, interest in QAnon surged, making it one of the biggest topics of the day, with more than 200,000 QAnon google searches.

If you’re one of the thousands of people interested in learning about Q, you can read my American Thinker article, “An Introduction to Q” and my follow-up articles. The mainstream media has deployed hundreds of attacks on Q, depicting it as a crazy, baseless, far-right conspiracy theory. My articles seriously examine the ever-growing phenomenon of Q, whose followers believe that it is a unique military intelligence operation designed to inform the public about global crimes.

In other Twitter news this week, it announced that it now formally permits “discussions related to child sexual exploitation as a phenomenon or attraction to minors” and “artistic depictions of nude minors.”

So, Twitter will allow child exploitation discussions, continue to permit the incendiary accounts of the Ayatollah of Iran, Louis Farrakhan, and Antifa, and ban discussions among patriots seeking to uncover state crimes.

If you don’t follow Q, these contradictions may seem ridiculous. If you do follow Q, they make perfect sense.

Nothing tastes sweeter than forbidden fruit. On July 21st, Twitter announced that it was deleting 7,000 QAnon accounts, limiting the reach of 150,000 others and banning Q-related topics from trending. Immediately, interest in QAnon surged, making it one of the biggest topics of the day, with more than 200,000 QAnon google searches.

If you’re one of the thousands of people interested in learning about Q, you can read my American Thinker article, “An Introduction to Q” and my follow-up articles. The mainstream media has deployed hundreds of attacks on Q, depicting it as a crazy, baseless, far-right conspiracy theory. My articles seriously examine the ever-growing phenomenon of Q, whose followers believe that it is a unique military intelligence operation designed to inform the public about global crimes.

In other Twitter news this week, it announced that it now formally permits “discussions related to child sexual exploitation as a phenomenon or attraction to minors” and “artistic depictions of nude minors.”

So, Twitter will allow child exploitation discussions, continue to permit the incendiary accounts of the Ayatollah of Iran, Louis Farrakhan, and Antifa, and ban discussions among patriots seeking to uncover state crimes.

If you don’t follow Q, these contradictions may seem ridiculous. If you do follow Q, they make perfect sense.