The hideous face of abortion extremism

If you watched a lot of television in the late 1990s and early 2000s, you might have heard of Elizabeth Jean “Busy” Philipps. Or if you saw a handful of not-very-popular thrillers and romcoms in the past 20 years, you might have heard of Busy Philipps. Philipps also had a little talk show for a while. It's a decent enough career and Philipps probably gets solid residuals when people watch her TV shows or movies on Netflix. Still, when thinking about what Hollywood can offer those who make it, Philipps never hit the big time. 

What does make Philipps exceptional, however, is that she is the hideous face of abortion extremism. To appreciate how far abortion has traveled in the 47 years since Roe v. Wade legalized abortion thanks to newly discovered constitutional penumbras and emanations, think back to the left's promises about those who would benefit from legal abortion. They assured us that legal abortion would protect women who had been kicked onto the streets, barefoot and pregnant; women with eight children under the age of ten, and more on the way; women who were brutally raped by home intruders; and women who would die if their pregnancies continued.

Even in the 1990s, abortion was supposed to be something off the beaten track. Those of us who are old enough remember the Clinton mantra: “Safe, rare, and legal.”

The idea that abortion exists to protect women from truly horrible life events or dangerous health problems or that it should be safe and rare is gone. The reason abortion is making headlines again – and that Sen. Chuck Schumer is openly threatening Supreme Court justices – is because Democrats are challenging a Louisiana law that tries to keep women safe from abortionists such as Kermit Gosnell.

As for the idea that abortion should be rare, that’s gone too. For today’s abortion activists, abortion is all about “me, me, me.” Nothing exemplifies that mindset more than a speech that Busy Philipps gave at the same venue in which Chuck Schumer issued his threats:

There I was sitting in Los Angeles in my beautiful office of my own late-night talk show. Soon I would be driving my hybrid car to my beautiful fucking home to kiss my beautiful and healthy children and my husband who had taken the year off to parent so I could focus on my career. And I have all of this – ALL OF IT – because, because, because I was allowed bodily autonomy at fifteen.

I will not be shamed into being quiet. We will not be shamed into being quiet. Never again. I will never stop talking about my abortion, or my periods, or my experiences in childbirth, my episiotomies, my yeast infections, or my ovulation that lines up with the moon.

Summed up, Philipps says that taking a life was worth it to get an office, a hybrid car, and a nice house.

Philipps shouts to the heavens that she's happy with her choice, but one has to wonder. Listening to the frenzied hysteria in her voice, Shakespeare’s line from Hamlet that “The lady doth protest too much, methinks” seems apropos. This woman is not at ease with herself. Instead, it seems that she’s going to force the whole world to agree with her that a baby’s life was a fair exchange for that environmentally-caring car and a boast-worthy office.

If challenged, Philipps will presumably claim that she had her abortion at fifteen because she was raped. Thus, in her autobiography, she writes that decades after the fact, she figured out that her then-boyfriend raped her. If it takes you decades to figure out you were raped. . . .

Also, one has to ask: Where the heck were her parents in all this if she was alone with a boy having sex when she was only fourteen?

American’s are sophisticated about abortion and can have very nuanced views. Some are absolutists – no abortion whatsoever – and others are willing to factor in the circumstances under which the pregnancy occurred, whether stranger rape, incest rape, or risks to the mother’s health.

It’s open to question, though, whether Americans will accept that abortion is an excellent idea because it can lead to careers and those all-important, saving-the-planet hybrid cars. Most Americans might find this self-centered thinking off-putting, if not out-and-out horrifying.

If you watched a lot of television in the late 1990s and early 2000s, you might have heard of Elizabeth Jean “Busy” Philipps. Or if you saw a handful of not-very-popular thrillers and romcoms in the past 20 years, you might have heard of Busy Philipps. Philipps also had a little talk show for a while. It's a decent enough career and Philipps probably gets solid residuals when people watch her TV shows or movies on Netflix. Still, when thinking about what Hollywood can offer those who make it, Philipps never hit the big time. 

What does make Philipps exceptional, however, is that she is the hideous face of abortion extremism. To appreciate how far abortion has traveled in the 47 years since Roe v. Wade legalized abortion thanks to newly discovered constitutional penumbras and emanations, think back to the left's promises about those who would benefit from legal abortion. They assured us that legal abortion would protect women who had been kicked onto the streets, barefoot and pregnant; women with eight children under the age of ten, and more on the way; women who were brutally raped by home intruders; and women who would die if their pregnancies continued.

Even in the 1990s, abortion was supposed to be something off the beaten track. Those of us who are old enough remember the Clinton mantra: “Safe, rare, and legal.”

The idea that abortion exists to protect women from truly horrible life events or dangerous health problems or that it should be safe and rare is gone. The reason abortion is making headlines again – and that Sen. Chuck Schumer is openly threatening Supreme Court justices – is because Democrats are challenging a Louisiana law that tries to keep women safe from abortionists such as Kermit Gosnell.

As for the idea that abortion should be rare, that’s gone too. For today’s abortion activists, abortion is all about “me, me, me.” Nothing exemplifies that mindset more than a speech that Busy Philipps gave at the same venue in which Chuck Schumer issued his threats:

There I was sitting in Los Angeles in my beautiful office of my own late-night talk show. Soon I would be driving my hybrid car to my beautiful fucking home to kiss my beautiful and healthy children and my husband who had taken the year off to parent so I could focus on my career. And I have all of this – ALL OF IT – because, because, because I was allowed bodily autonomy at fifteen.

I will not be shamed into being quiet. We will not be shamed into being quiet. Never again. I will never stop talking about my abortion, or my periods, or my experiences in childbirth, my episiotomies, my yeast infections, or my ovulation that lines up with the moon.

Summed up, Philipps says that taking a life was worth it to get an office, a hybrid car, and a nice house.

Philipps shouts to the heavens that she's happy with her choice, but one has to wonder. Listening to the frenzied hysteria in her voice, Shakespeare’s line from Hamlet that “The lady doth protest too much, methinks” seems apropos. This woman is not at ease with herself. Instead, it seems that she’s going to force the whole world to agree with her that a baby’s life was a fair exchange for that environmentally-caring car and a boast-worthy office.

If challenged, Philipps will presumably claim that she had her abortion at fifteen because she was raped. Thus, in her autobiography, she writes that decades after the fact, she figured out that her then-boyfriend raped her. If it takes you decades to figure out you were raped. . . .

Also, one has to ask: Where the heck were her parents in all this if she was alone with a boy having sex when she was only fourteen?

American’s are sophisticated about abortion and can have very nuanced views. Some are absolutists – no abortion whatsoever – and others are willing to factor in the circumstances under which the pregnancy occurred, whether stranger rape, incest rape, or risks to the mother’s health.

It’s open to question, though, whether Americans will accept that abortion is an excellent idea because it can lead to careers and those all-important, saving-the-planet hybrid cars. Most Americans might find this self-centered thinking off-putting, if not out-and-out horrifying.