Now that Elizabeth Warren has pulled out, what can we expect?

At long last, on Thursday, Elizabeth Warren withdrew from the Democrat primary. Her withdrawal creates clarity because Bernie the Red and Bad Touch Biden are the last candidates standing. (And no, nobody takes Tulsi seriously as a potential candidate.)

Thanks to Biden’s momentum on Super Tuesday, political watchers assume that the Democrat establishment successfully squashed Bernie’s candidacy and that it will be smooth sailing for Biden. Things may not be that simple, though.

It’s challenging to write a political epitaph for Warren. She tried to echo Bill Clinton’s appealing wonkishness but never rose above being a shrew. She always had “plans,” but they had a complicated, Rube Goldberg quality. When analyzed, they either wouldn’t work, or they’d work very effectively at making government bigger and more intrusive than ever.

As the campaign progressed, Warren threw herself frantically at various Democrat special interest groups. Even though, if she did win the primary, she’d just be the second woman to have done so (and as Jerry Seinfeld once pointed out, second is no big deal), she insisted that her two X chromosomes made her peculiarly suited for the presidency.

Eventually, Warren, a millionaire twelve times over who profited from flipping houses during the recession, positioned herself as a Bernie-style leftist. Indeed, during the South Carolina debate, she was reduced to saying that she would implement all of Bernie’s programs, only she would do it better.

Warren's departure from the stage is no loss to anyone except her legion of female supporters who buy into the theory that being a woman somehow makes Warren special. It’s certainly amusing to see them claim that sexism jettisoned her candidacy, considering that all this alleged sexism comes from the Democrat side of the aisle.

While Warren added nothing to the primary campaign, her departure may make a substantial difference. Keep in mind that Biden currently has 627 delegates, and Bernie has 551, a difference of only 76 delegates.

This small difference matters because, while the Republicans award all of a state’s primary delegates to the candidate who receives the most votes, the Democrats apportion delegates. By the time the Republicans arrive at the convention, there’s usually a clear winner. That isn’t the case for the Democrats and, unless one of them has a clear majority on the first ballot, the dreaded superdelegates might step in.

As Trump pointed out regarding Warren, she’s Bernie’s ideological clone, except that she’s the schoolmarm to his crazy uncle, meaning that she probably took votes that would have gone to Bernie on or before Super Tuesday. Now that she’s gone, in future primaries there’ll be more unattached leftists who might cast votes for Bernie.

Another thing that may play in Bernie’s favor is that Super Tuesday featured a lot of conservative southern states, such as Arkansas and Alabama. Southern Democrats may be leery of socialism, unlike Democrats in states such as Washington, Oregon, Hawaii, New Jersey, or the District of Columbia. (Florida, of course, that goldmine of delegates, is unlikely to go for a candidate who hates Israel and loves Castro’s Cuba.)

What may also help Bernie is that Joe is a terrible candidate. He's corrupt, dishonest, stupid, vicious, and manifestly senile. He’s also ideologically wish-washy. Although Biden always stays on the Democrat side of the aisle, from within that Democrat cocoon, he’ll say anything to win.

Bernie, of course, is also corrupt and dishonest. At a meta-level, he’s corrupt and dishonest because he tells people socialism/communism will make their lives better. That’s shows a corrupt soul and a lust for power that has him lying at a very fundamental level about his ideology.

Even if one assumes, though, that Bernie believes his shtick, he has proven to be a gross hypocrite with his millions of dollars, three very nice houses, and reliance on private jets. Once he got rich, he stopped attacking millionaires and started going after billionaires. In other words, Bernie’s principles are no better than, and are probably much worse than, everyone else’s.

Still, despite being corrupt at both deep and superficial levels, Bernie’s sold as an honest guy because he’s loved communism from the cradle. He’s a one-trick pony, so he can’t be tripped up on much, in contrast to Biden, who’s all over the board on everything. For all those reasons, even though the establishment wants to shake Bernie off, he may hang in there like a tick on a dog.

The one sure thing is that the rest of the Democrat primary, right through to the convention, is going to be great fun for people who consider politics a spectator sport. And the one worrisome thing is that there is a possibility that Biden or Bernie could take the White House.

At long last, on Thursday, Elizabeth Warren withdrew from the Democrat primary. Her withdrawal creates clarity because Bernie the Red and Bad Touch Biden are the last candidates standing. (And no, nobody takes Tulsi seriously as a potential candidate.)

Thanks to Biden’s momentum on Super Tuesday, political watchers assume that the Democrat establishment successfully squashed Bernie’s candidacy and that it will be smooth sailing for Biden. Things may not be that simple, though.

It’s challenging to write a political epitaph for Warren. She tried to echo Bill Clinton’s appealing wonkishness but never rose above being a shrew. She always had “plans,” but they had a complicated, Rube Goldberg quality. When analyzed, they either wouldn’t work, or they’d work very effectively at making government bigger and more intrusive than ever.

As the campaign progressed, Warren threw herself frantically at various Democrat special interest groups. Even though, if she did win the primary, she’d just be the second woman to have done so (and as Jerry Seinfeld once pointed out, second is no big deal), she insisted that her two X chromosomes made her peculiarly suited for the presidency.

Eventually, Warren, a millionaire twelve times over who profited from flipping houses during the recession, positioned herself as a Bernie-style leftist. Indeed, during the South Carolina debate, she was reduced to saying that she would implement all of Bernie’s programs, only she would do it better.

Warren's departure from the stage is no loss to anyone except her legion of female supporters who buy into the theory that being a woman somehow makes Warren special. It’s certainly amusing to see them claim that sexism jettisoned her candidacy, considering that all this alleged sexism comes from the Democrat side of the aisle.

While Warren added nothing to the primary campaign, her departure may make a substantial difference. Keep in mind that Biden currently has 627 delegates, and Bernie has 551, a difference of only 76 delegates.

This small difference matters because, while the Republicans award all of a state’s primary delegates to the candidate who receives the most votes, the Democrats apportion delegates. By the time the Republicans arrive at the convention, there’s usually a clear winner. That isn’t the case for the Democrats and, unless one of them has a clear majority on the first ballot, the dreaded superdelegates might step in.

As Trump pointed out regarding Warren, she’s Bernie’s ideological clone, except that she’s the schoolmarm to his crazy uncle, meaning that she probably took votes that would have gone to Bernie on or before Super Tuesday. Now that she’s gone, in future primaries there’ll be more unattached leftists who might cast votes for Bernie.

Another thing that may play in Bernie’s favor is that Super Tuesday featured a lot of conservative southern states, such as Arkansas and Alabama. Southern Democrats may be leery of socialism, unlike Democrats in states such as Washington, Oregon, Hawaii, New Jersey, or the District of Columbia. (Florida, of course, that goldmine of delegates, is unlikely to go for a candidate who hates Israel and loves Castro’s Cuba.)

What may also help Bernie is that Joe is a terrible candidate. He's corrupt, dishonest, stupid, vicious, and manifestly senile. He’s also ideologically wish-washy. Although Biden always stays on the Democrat side of the aisle, from within that Democrat cocoon, he’ll say anything to win.

Bernie, of course, is also corrupt and dishonest. At a meta-level, he’s corrupt and dishonest because he tells people socialism/communism will make their lives better. That’s shows a corrupt soul and a lust for power that has him lying at a very fundamental level about his ideology.

Even if one assumes, though, that Bernie believes his shtick, he has proven to be a gross hypocrite with his millions of dollars, three very nice houses, and reliance on private jets. Once he got rich, he stopped attacking millionaires and started going after billionaires. In other words, Bernie’s principles are no better than, and are probably much worse than, everyone else’s.

Still, despite being corrupt at both deep and superficial levels, Bernie’s sold as an honest guy because he’s loved communism from the cradle. He’s a one-trick pony, so he can’t be tripped up on much, in contrast to Biden, who’s all over the board on everything. For all those reasons, even though the establishment wants to shake Bernie off, he may hang in there like a tick on a dog.

The one sure thing is that the rest of the Democrat primary, right through to the convention, is going to be great fun for people who consider politics a spectator sport. And the one worrisome thing is that there is a possibility that Biden or Bernie could take the White House.