The day the US beat the virus

The "experts" and the "media" are eternally and loudly predicting doom and gloom, so I took Sunday to look at the bright side.

Here is a view from ground level. 

Everybody went shopping last Thursday.  Normally, our local big chain crowds up on Sunday afternoon in the winter, but Thursday probably set an all-time attendance record.  The atmosphere was all business — shoppers on a mission.  There wasn't a particular run on things, just those you would expect: rice, spaghetti noodles, mac and cheese.  There was plenty of meat and lots of beautiful produce.  I love roasted red peppers.  As I moved through one aisle, I heard a bit of distraction.  Soft but angry words were being tossed to a manager defending the momentary policy of limiting toilet paper to two packs per customer.  The angry woman was vertically challenged but made up for it on the opposing plane.  I didn't need to, but I walked by.  

"I have the right to buy as many as I want."

Okay, she's no legal scholar, but she is definitely entitled.

I kept slowly moving past them because it was apparent that no blows would be thrown; I might have enjoyed a ringside seat just out of wallop reach.  I once saw two dang fools tuggling from a safe distance of forty feet in the bagging area of a large department store.  They managed only three short breathless rounds.  One of the worst fights ever, but it was free.

Last Thursday, probably 63 million Americans knew that the president was going to ask us to slow down over the weekend, to stock up a little, stay home if possible, and maybe say a prayer for those afflicted. 

The smart 63 million among us knew what he was going to say because it makes so much sense for so many reasons.

Then he said it.

And that's just what we did.  We took a breath when one was needed.  Those who could stay home did stay home.  We composed ourselves and went to work on the real problem. 

We decided to deprive the disease of an easy shot at us.

I'm not a big fan of Trump rallies or Trump tweets, but I know when he is speaking right at me.  And I'm not alone.  When this is all over, when better days are on the horizon, it will be the Trump Team that was composed throughout the battle.  It will be the conservative side of our nation that carried the day because we were not concerned with politics.  We didn't attack peripheral matters such as guns and alcohol like the mayors of several cities.

We mostly stayed home and fought the battle of virulence on its own field.

And down here at ground zero, it feels today like certain victory is in sight.

The "experts" and the "media" are eternally and loudly predicting doom and gloom, so I took Sunday to look at the bright side.

Here is a view from ground level. 

Everybody went shopping last Thursday.  Normally, our local big chain crowds up on Sunday afternoon in the winter, but Thursday probably set an all-time attendance record.  The atmosphere was all business — shoppers on a mission.  There wasn't a particular run on things, just those you would expect: rice, spaghetti noodles, mac and cheese.  There was plenty of meat and lots of beautiful produce.  I love roasted red peppers.  As I moved through one aisle, I heard a bit of distraction.  Soft but angry words were being tossed to a manager defending the momentary policy of limiting toilet paper to two packs per customer.  The angry woman was vertically challenged but made up for it on the opposing plane.  I didn't need to, but I walked by.  

"I have the right to buy as many as I want."

Okay, she's no legal scholar, but she is definitely entitled.

I kept slowly moving past them because it was apparent that no blows would be thrown; I might have enjoyed a ringside seat just out of wallop reach.  I once saw two dang fools tuggling from a safe distance of forty feet in the bagging area of a large department store.  They managed only three short breathless rounds.  One of the worst fights ever, but it was free.

Last Thursday, probably 63 million Americans knew that the president was going to ask us to slow down over the weekend, to stock up a little, stay home if possible, and maybe say a prayer for those afflicted. 

The smart 63 million among us knew what he was going to say because it makes so much sense for so many reasons.

Then he said it.

And that's just what we did.  We took a breath when one was needed.  Those who could stay home did stay home.  We composed ourselves and went to work on the real problem. 

We decided to deprive the disease of an easy shot at us.

I'm not a big fan of Trump rallies or Trump tweets, but I know when he is speaking right at me.  And I'm not alone.  When this is all over, when better days are on the horizon, it will be the Trump Team that was composed throughout the battle.  It will be the conservative side of our nation that carried the day because we were not concerned with politics.  We didn't attack peripheral matters such as guns and alcohol like the mayors of several cities.

We mostly stayed home and fought the battle of virulence on its own field.

And down here at ground zero, it feels today like certain victory is in sight.