Silver lining in the clouds: These businesses and jobs are thriving

Americans may be slightly down during the current Wuhan China coronavirus madness reaction, but we are certainly not out.  While businesses of all sizes and workers of all backgrounds and economic levels will suffer from the restrictive laws on what are normally personal and private legal activities that will allegedly combat the spread of the disease, American ingenuity and independence continue providing the essentials of life.  And jobs.  Well, for some.  And depending on the definition of essentials.  As the New York Post reports: 

The coronavirus is proving healthy for some city businesses... there are still a few enterprises that have not only survived, but thrived.

Online booze-delivery services, car-rental firms and local bodegas are among the lucky ones, workers said Monday.

"Friday, March 13, was Drizly's largest day ever in sales, beating out New Year's Eve and Halloween, which are usually our most popular days,'' a rep for the alcohol-delivery service told The Post.

At Minibar Delivery, a rep said, "Thursday was 80 percent higher than the previous Thursday,'' and Sunday was 57 percent more than a week earlier.

"Friday, March 13, was Drizly's largest day ever in sales, beating out New Year's Eve and Halloween, which are usually our most popular days,'' a rep for the alcohol-delivery service told The Post.

At Minibar Delivery, a rep said, "Thursday was 80 percent higher than the previous Thursday,'' and Sunday was 57 percent more than a week earlier. (snip)

The company said New York City orders helped drive its coronavirus gains, followed by Houston and DC.

The virus also is creating a boon for the local car-rental business — with more New Yorkers looking to either get out of town to dodge the crowds or take advantage of school being out and hitting the road with the kids to see family, employees said. (snip)

Matthew Walters, the 39-year-old owner of the Douglaston Deli on the Douglaston Parkway in Queens, said he's seen a boost in his bottom line since the spread of the coronavirus, too.

"I'm not going to lie, sales are way up. Like when a snowstorm hits,'' Walters said of business.

And late Monday afternoon Amazon announced:

Amazon ramps hiring, opening 100,000 new roles to support people relying on Amazon's service in this stressful time

Company will invest over $350 million globally to increase pay by $2/hour in the U.S., £2/hr in the UK, and approximately €2/hr in many EU countries for employees and partners who are in fulfillment centers, transportation operations, stores or those making deliveries so that others can remain at home.

Naturally, the illness itself has spurred job creation and not just in the medical field as Business Insider reports. 

The growing spread of coronavirus has caused a surge in demand for certain jobs, as US companies look for ways to address the outbreak and the anxiety around it.

Job-posting site Glassdoor recently published an Economic Research report about how workers are reacting to coronavirus. Daniel Zhao, a Glassdoor senior economist and data scientist, wrote in the report that the company has noticed an increase in job postings for researchers and healthcare professionals specifically asking for people who can help with coronavirus-related communications, research, or medical assistance. (snip)

In Washington, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation recently posted several positions for their newly formed COVID-19 Response team. The positions include program manager and associate strategy officer that will last until the end of December.

And not all the Wuhan China coronavirus-created jobs require highly skilled workers.  ZipRecruiter has jobs for people with basic cleaning knowledge. 

Coronavirus causing a 75% spike in demand for new hires in this sector

Job openings for cleaners are shooting through the roof as the U.S. mobilizes to contain the coronavirus, but hiring is likely to plunge in industries suffering most from the interruptions in daily life.

The online jobs marketplace ZipRecruiter says help-wanted ads for cleaners are on track to surge 75% in March compared to a year earlier. By contrast, they were just 24% higher in January.

And, as this is a year that numerically ends in 0 (zero), it is required by law that the U.S. conduct a census — which means there is a need for Census workers ZipRecuiter added.  Or maybe not.  

What might help keep the labor market stabile is temporary employment for the U.S. Census. The government is aiming to hire 500,000 people to canvass the country in the next few months for the once-in-a-decade Census taking.

"This might pull in some people who temporarily lose work due to the virus," Pollack said.

That is, assuming the government proceeds as planned with the Census. Sending 500,000 people around the county to survey tens of millions of Americans is not an ideal strategy amid a nationwide effort to suppress an epidemic.

No!  Of course, these jobs won't replace the many that are lost or temporarily eliminated or aid the businesses and their employees who will truly suffer financially from the drastic government-imposed measures.  The negative economic repercussions will affect all segments of American society in multiple aspects of life for quite a while.  But there is some bit of relief.

Americans may be slightly down during the current Wuhan China coronavirus madness reaction, but we are certainly not out.  While businesses of all sizes and workers of all backgrounds and economic levels will suffer from the restrictive laws on what are normally personal and private legal activities that will allegedly combat the spread of the disease, American ingenuity and independence continue providing the essentials of life.  And jobs.  Well, for some.  And depending on the definition of essentials.  As the New York Post reports: 

The coronavirus is proving healthy for some city businesses... there are still a few enterprises that have not only survived, but thrived.

Online booze-delivery services, car-rental firms and local bodegas are among the lucky ones, workers said Monday.

"Friday, March 13, was Drizly's largest day ever in sales, beating out New Year's Eve and Halloween, which are usually our most popular days,'' a rep for the alcohol-delivery service told The Post.

At Minibar Delivery, a rep said, "Thursday was 80 percent higher than the previous Thursday,'' and Sunday was 57 percent more than a week earlier.

"Friday, March 13, was Drizly's largest day ever in sales, beating out New Year's Eve and Halloween, which are usually our most popular days,'' a rep for the alcohol-delivery service told The Post.

At Minibar Delivery, a rep said, "Thursday was 80 percent higher than the previous Thursday,'' and Sunday was 57 percent more than a week earlier. (snip)

The company said New York City orders helped drive its coronavirus gains, followed by Houston and DC.

The virus also is creating a boon for the local car-rental business — with more New Yorkers looking to either get out of town to dodge the crowds or take advantage of school being out and hitting the road with the kids to see family, employees said. (snip)

Matthew Walters, the 39-year-old owner of the Douglaston Deli on the Douglaston Parkway in Queens, said he's seen a boost in his bottom line since the spread of the coronavirus, too.

"I'm not going to lie, sales are way up. Like when a snowstorm hits,'' Walters said of business.

And late Monday afternoon Amazon announced:

Amazon ramps hiring, opening 100,000 new roles to support people relying on Amazon's service in this stressful time

Company will invest over $350 million globally to increase pay by $2/hour in the U.S., £2/hr in the UK, and approximately €2/hr in many EU countries for employees and partners who are in fulfillment centers, transportation operations, stores or those making deliveries so that others can remain at home.

Naturally, the illness itself has spurred job creation and not just in the medical field as Business Insider reports. 

The growing spread of coronavirus has caused a surge in demand for certain jobs, as US companies look for ways to address the outbreak and the anxiety around it.

Job-posting site Glassdoor recently published an Economic Research report about how workers are reacting to coronavirus. Daniel Zhao, a Glassdoor senior economist and data scientist, wrote in the report that the company has noticed an increase in job postings for researchers and healthcare professionals specifically asking for people who can help with coronavirus-related communications, research, or medical assistance. (snip)

In Washington, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation recently posted several positions for their newly formed COVID-19 Response team. The positions include program manager and associate strategy officer that will last until the end of December.

And not all the Wuhan China coronavirus-created jobs require highly skilled workers.  ZipRecruiter has jobs for people with basic cleaning knowledge. 

Coronavirus causing a 75% spike in demand for new hires in this sector

Job openings for cleaners are shooting through the roof as the U.S. mobilizes to contain the coronavirus, but hiring is likely to plunge in industries suffering most from the interruptions in daily life.

The online jobs marketplace ZipRecruiter says help-wanted ads for cleaners are on track to surge 75% in March compared to a year earlier. By contrast, they were just 24% higher in January.

And, as this is a year that numerically ends in 0 (zero), it is required by law that the U.S. conduct a census — which means there is a need for Census workers ZipRecuiter added.  Or maybe not.  

What might help keep the labor market stabile is temporary employment for the U.S. Census. The government is aiming to hire 500,000 people to canvass the country in the next few months for the once-in-a-decade Census taking.

"This might pull in some people who temporarily lose work due to the virus," Pollack said.

That is, assuming the government proceeds as planned with the Census. Sending 500,000 people around the county to survey tens of millions of Americans is not an ideal strategy amid a nationwide effort to suppress an epidemic.

No!  Of course, these jobs won't replace the many that are lost or temporarily eliminated or aid the businesses and their employees who will truly suffer financially from the drastic government-imposed measures.  The negative economic repercussions will affect all segments of American society in multiple aspects of life for quite a while.  But there is some bit of relief.