President Trump continues his outreach to the African-American community

Although it was black voters in South Carolina who probably saved Biden's bacon by giving him a much-needed bounce, it might be black voters who give Trump help in retaining the White House.  In 2016, Trump was able to win the White House with only 8% of the black vote.  Although that meant that 92% of blacks who voted went for Hillary, the problem was with the number of blacks who stayed home: of the black voters who turned out for Obama in 2012, 7% stayed home for Hillary in 2016.

If Democrats are to have a prayer of retaking the White House, they're going to need lots of black voters.  Trump aims to deny them those votes.  As reported here earlier, Trump is doing something Republicans should have been doing for years: making a direct play for black voters.

To his credit, Trump is not offering black voters more and more welfare.  Instead, he's making the pitch that, by improving the economy and enforcing border control laws, the lives of black Americans are improving dramatically.  Trump is impressing upon them the fact that the scary things Democrats have been saying about him vis-à-vis African-Americans are untrue.

Certainly, Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) believes that Trump's efforts will pay off:

On Wednesday night, Trump appeared on Sean Hannity’s show to remind voters how his policies benefit black Americans, with special emphasis on the way in which he’s reversed Democrat policies (especially Biden’s and Obama’s) that locked blacks in prisons and kept them in economic ghettoes:

It's probable that few Democrat-voting blacks pay attention to Sean Hannity.  However, also on Wednesday, Trump got support from someone who is popular within the black community.  Kim Kardashian gave a big shout-out to Trump for his decision to commute the sentences of three minority women:

Because Kim Kardashian matters, Van Jones, a socialist but a surprisingly honest man, retweeted what she had to say.  This meant that another person popular in the black community gave a shout-out to Trump for actually making black lives matter, instead of just spouting platitudes about black lives:

The most pathetic (but, sadly, popular) response was a petty little stab at Obama's border policies, which the tweeter attributed to Trump:

Myriad responses set him straight (although they probably didn't change his mind):

The important thing is that Kim retweeted this moment, giving it tremendous weight:

For well over 150 years, Democrats have sought to separate blacks from America, first as slaves, then as Jim Crow victims, and then as identity-politics victims.  When Democrats control education, they teach blacks that America is a hateful, cruel place that snatched their ancestors from the paradise that was Wakanda...er, Africa.

American education would change profoundly if students could read Keith Richburg's powerful and brilliant Out of America: A Black Man Confronts Africa.  Having spent several years in Africa as the Washington Post's African bureau chief, Richburg returned to America incredibly grateful for those unnamed ancestors who had suffered so horribly on the transatlantic passage and then again as slaves.  Africa is a sad and deadly place.

Perhaps President Trump will be the man who, at long last, brings American blacks home to their real country: America.

Although it was black voters in South Carolina who probably saved Biden's bacon by giving him a much-needed bounce, it might be black voters who give Trump help in retaining the White House.  In 2016, Trump was able to win the White House with only 8% of the black vote.  Although that meant that 92% of blacks who voted went for Hillary, the problem was with the number of blacks who stayed home: of the black voters who turned out for Obama in 2012, 7% stayed home for Hillary in 2016.

If Democrats are to have a prayer of retaking the White House, they're going to need lots of black voters.  Trump aims to deny them those votes.  As reported here earlier, Trump is doing something Republicans should have been doing for years: making a direct play for black voters.

To his credit, Trump is not offering black voters more and more welfare.  Instead, he's making the pitch that, by improving the economy and enforcing border control laws, the lives of black Americans are improving dramatically.  Trump is impressing upon them the fact that the scary things Democrats have been saying about him vis-à-vis African-Americans are untrue.

Certainly, Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) believes that Trump's efforts will pay off:

On Wednesday night, Trump appeared on Sean Hannity’s show to remind voters how his policies benefit black Americans, with special emphasis on the way in which he’s reversed Democrat policies (especially Biden’s and Obama’s) that locked blacks in prisons and kept them in economic ghettoes:

It's probable that few Democrat-voting blacks pay attention to Sean Hannity.  However, also on Wednesday, Trump got support from someone who is popular within the black community.  Kim Kardashian gave a big shout-out to Trump for his decision to commute the sentences of three minority women:

Because Kim Kardashian matters, Van Jones, a socialist but a surprisingly honest man, retweeted what she had to say.  This meant that another person popular in the black community gave a shout-out to Trump for actually making black lives matter, instead of just spouting platitudes about black lives:

The most pathetic (but, sadly, popular) response was a petty little stab at Obama's border policies, which the tweeter attributed to Trump:

Myriad responses set him straight (although they probably didn't change his mind):

The important thing is that Kim retweeted this moment, giving it tremendous weight:

For well over 150 years, Democrats have sought to separate blacks from America, first as slaves, then as Jim Crow victims, and then as identity-politics victims.  When Democrats control education, they teach blacks that America is a hateful, cruel place that snatched their ancestors from the paradise that was Wakanda...er, Africa.

American education would change profoundly if students could read Keith Richburg's powerful and brilliant Out of America: A Black Man Confronts Africa.  Having spent several years in Africa as the Washington Post's African bureau chief, Richburg returned to America incredibly grateful for those unnamed ancestors who had suffered so horribly on the transatlantic passage and then again as slaves.  Africa is a sad and deadly place.

Perhaps President Trump will be the man who, at long last, brings American blacks home to their real country: America.