Mike Bloomberg, mini-tyrant

Mike Bloomberg's not a big fan of everybody having guns.  Gee, Mike, neither is anybody else.  Felons, the insane, the blind, and little kids ought never have guns.  And nobody I know of has ever advocated that they should.

That's not whom Mike has in mind.  He means people such as myself, a retired teacher, or my erstwhile neighbor, who owns a cartage service, or the owner of the quick stop store on the corner.  Mike thinks we're dangerous and ought not to have guns for defense against the predators in our midst.

That's as opposed to important peeps like Mike.  He perhaps doesn't carry or even own a gun, but then he can pay others to keep him safe with their guns.  Why he trusts them but doesn't trust me remains a mystery.  People like me overwhelmingly constitute the majority of Americans — responsible, taxpaying family people looking out for ourselves.  We can only conclude that Mike doesn't want us looking out for ourselves.  We're not important enough or responsible enough to do that.

But even that wouldn't matter so much if his concern really were for us.  He proved otherwise as mayor of Noo Yock when he outlawed large-size sodas.  This kind of petty tyranny betrays his motive as unrelated to concern and rather just wanting to order people around.  Some might uncharitably attribute that to a Napoleonic complex compensating for stature deficit.  I think it's simpler than that; I think Mike's just a bossy dude looking down his nose at the world.

Nor do I think a $60B checking account indicates smarts.  The ability to make money is a talent, such as math or music.  Mozart could play piano at age four, and savants perform incredible math feats in their heads.  But they aren't any smarter than anybody else outside their special talent and often are very much less so.

I suspect this is the case with Mike Bloomberg.  Famously unpopular with pert near everybody, he has no grasp of how to get people to like him for his ideas or his manner.  What he lacks is leadership, another talent that some are born with, but most are not.  Some aspects of leadership can be learned, but the ability to inspire is nearly always something you're born with or without.

Some cats got it, and some cats ain't.  Bloomers ain't.

Mike Bloomberg's not a big fan of everybody having guns.  Gee, Mike, neither is anybody else.  Felons, the insane, the blind, and little kids ought never have guns.  And nobody I know of has ever advocated that they should.

That's not whom Mike has in mind.  He means people such as myself, a retired teacher, or my erstwhile neighbor, who owns a cartage service, or the owner of the quick stop store on the corner.  Mike thinks we're dangerous and ought not to have guns for defense against the predators in our midst.

That's as opposed to important peeps like Mike.  He perhaps doesn't carry or even own a gun, but then he can pay others to keep him safe with their guns.  Why he trusts them but doesn't trust me remains a mystery.  People like me overwhelmingly constitute the majority of Americans — responsible, taxpaying family people looking out for ourselves.  We can only conclude that Mike doesn't want us looking out for ourselves.  We're not important enough or responsible enough to do that.

But even that wouldn't matter so much if his concern really were for us.  He proved otherwise as mayor of Noo Yock when he outlawed large-size sodas.  This kind of petty tyranny betrays his motive as unrelated to concern and rather just wanting to order people around.  Some might uncharitably attribute that to a Napoleonic complex compensating for stature deficit.  I think it's simpler than that; I think Mike's just a bossy dude looking down his nose at the world.

Nor do I think a $60B checking account indicates smarts.  The ability to make money is a talent, such as math or music.  Mozart could play piano at age four, and savants perform incredible math feats in their heads.  But they aren't any smarter than anybody else outside their special talent and often are very much less so.

I suspect this is the case with Mike Bloomberg.  Famously unpopular with pert near everybody, he has no grasp of how to get people to like him for his ideas or his manner.  What he lacks is leadership, another talent that some are born with, but most are not.  Some aspects of leadership can be learned, but the ability to inspire is nearly always something you're born with or without.

Some cats got it, and some cats ain't.  Bloomers ain't.