In her post-SOTU and acquittal press conference, Pelosi lied about Trump

Thursday was a day on which President Trump and speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi engaged in a war of words.  His attacks were based upon the nonstop efforts Democrats, led by Pelosi, have made to overturn the 2016 election.  Hers were based upon the fact that Trump's policies have been wildly successful, while the Democrats have achieved nothing other than banging their heads against the brick wall that is President Donald Trump.

The setting for Pelosi's ferocious verbal attack against Trump was her weekly press conference.  The reasons for her anger and disconnect from reality were twofold:

First, on Tuesday, Trump gave a State of the Union speech that was magnificent.  In the first part, he recited his accomplishments, all of which have benefited the American people, especially the 99% (unlike Obama's "presidency for the 1%").  He then outlined plans that will bestow even more benefits on Americans, while introducing individuals who embody America's greatness.

Pelosi, on the other hand, engaged in petty pantomime, capped by her ripping up her copy of Trump's speech.  It was juvenile and offensive.

Then, on Wednesday, the Senate acquitted Trump of the impeachment charges the House Democrats had brought against him.  The outcome was preordained, but it was still a slap at the Democrats and a triumph for Trump.

It was against this backdrop that Pelosi dropped any pretense of respect for the president or his office and went crazy making things up:

As you know, this week we had the State of the Union.  As required by the Constitution of the United States, the President is to submit in writing or in person, his statement of the State of the Union.  What happened instead was a President using the Congress of the United States as a backdrop for a reality show, presenting a state of mind that had no contact with reality whatsoever.

Here's Pelosi bizarre reality:

Trump lied when he said he'll always protect Americans with pre-existing conditions, a lie Pelosi claimed is proven by his undermining Obamacare.

Trump lied when he said he had cut drug prices by making generics more readily available, something Pelosi said is proven by the fact that "the only way you're going to get lower prices" is if the government negotiates them.

Trump lied about preserving Medicare and Social Security because, Pelosi asserted, he's budgeted less for them, as if the only way to preserve those safety nets is to pour more money into the inefficient sinkhole.

Trump lied when he boasted about the incredible economy (more jobs, less unemployment, better blue-collar wages, better minority employment, more manufacturing, fewer people on welfare and food stamps, etc.) because Obama had a lower unemployment rate — a conclusion Pelosi reaches only by ignoring the fact that Obama messed with the numbers by failing to count as unemployed all the people who had stopped looking for jobs.

Trump lied about the stock market because it went from 6,000 to 18,000 under Obama — except that it did so against the backdrop of a stagnant economy in which people who ought to have been using their money to create businesses and jobs were so scared by Obama's anti-business policies that they parked their money in the market.

Trump lied about people going off food stamps because, claimed Pelosi, he actually "kicked them off."  Pelosi refused to recognize that Trump made sure that able-bodied people who don't like working don't use food stamps as a lifestyle.

In addition to her flights of fancy, the worst thing Pelosi did was to raise again the Charlottesville hoax.  One of the reporters was good enough to feed her a question about Trump's "rhetoric," and Pelosi seized the opportunity:

Well, let me just say that language — first of all, the whole State of the Union is beneath the dignity of the White House; an insult to the Congress of the United States and the American people.  So, their language is nothing that surprises anyone, but they have to know that when the White House speaks, those words weigh a ton.  And they are giving encouragement to people to do things — just as, remember, Charlottesville.  People were coming down that hill with tiki torches saying, 'The Jews will not replace us, the Jews will not replace us.'  And what was the President's statement?  'There are good people on both sides.'  Really?  'The Jews will not replace us,' and good people on both sides? 

This is an out-and-out Big Lie.  The original transcript shows absolutely that Trump was referring to people who had come to protest mob behavior and that he specifically and explicitly disavowed the white supremacists.

Dana Loesch reminded everyone that, while Pelosi was willing to lie about Trump, the most philo-Semitic president ever in the White House, it was Pelosi who sat by silently as members of her own party engaged in openly anti-Semitic behavior:

 

 

With this kind of open warfare coming on the heels of the Democrats' inability to remove him from office, no wonder Trump said Nancy Pelosi is a "horrible person." 

 

 

Thursday was a day on which President Trump and speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi engaged in a war of words.  His attacks were based upon the nonstop efforts Democrats, led by Pelosi, have made to overturn the 2016 election.  Hers were based upon the fact that Trump's policies have been wildly successful, while the Democrats have achieved nothing other than banging their heads against the brick wall that is President Donald Trump.

The setting for Pelosi's ferocious verbal attack against Trump was her weekly press conference.  The reasons for her anger and disconnect from reality were twofold:

First, on Tuesday, Trump gave a State of the Union speech that was magnificent.  In the first part, he recited his accomplishments, all of which have benefited the American people, especially the 99% (unlike Obama's "presidency for the 1%").  He then outlined plans that will bestow even more benefits on Americans, while introducing individuals who embody America's greatness.

Pelosi, on the other hand, engaged in petty pantomime, capped by her ripping up her copy of Trump's speech.  It was juvenile and offensive.

Then, on Wednesday, the Senate acquitted Trump of the impeachment charges the House Democrats had brought against him.  The outcome was preordained, but it was still a slap at the Democrats and a triumph for Trump.

It was against this backdrop that Pelosi dropped any pretense of respect for the president or his office and went crazy making things up:

As you know, this week we had the State of the Union.  As required by the Constitution of the United States, the President is to submit in writing or in person, his statement of the State of the Union.  What happened instead was a President using the Congress of the United States as a backdrop for a reality show, presenting a state of mind that had no contact with reality whatsoever.

Here's Pelosi bizarre reality:

Trump lied when he said he'll always protect Americans with pre-existing conditions, a lie Pelosi claimed is proven by his undermining Obamacare.

Trump lied when he said he had cut drug prices by making generics more readily available, something Pelosi said is proven by the fact that "the only way you're going to get lower prices" is if the government negotiates them.

Trump lied about preserving Medicare and Social Security because, Pelosi asserted, he's budgeted less for them, as if the only way to preserve those safety nets is to pour more money into the inefficient sinkhole.

Trump lied when he boasted about the incredible economy (more jobs, less unemployment, better blue-collar wages, better minority employment, more manufacturing, fewer people on welfare and food stamps, etc.) because Obama had a lower unemployment rate — a conclusion Pelosi reaches only by ignoring the fact that Obama messed with the numbers by failing to count as unemployed all the people who had stopped looking for jobs.

Trump lied about the stock market because it went from 6,000 to 18,000 under Obama — except that it did so against the backdrop of a stagnant economy in which people who ought to have been using their money to create businesses and jobs were so scared by Obama's anti-business policies that they parked their money in the market.

Trump lied about people going off food stamps because, claimed Pelosi, he actually "kicked them off."  Pelosi refused to recognize that Trump made sure that able-bodied people who don't like working don't use food stamps as a lifestyle.

In addition to her flights of fancy, the worst thing Pelosi did was to raise again the Charlottesville hoax.  One of the reporters was good enough to feed her a question about Trump's "rhetoric," and Pelosi seized the opportunity:

Well, let me just say that language — first of all, the whole State of the Union is beneath the dignity of the White House; an insult to the Congress of the United States and the American people.  So, their language is nothing that surprises anyone, but they have to know that when the White House speaks, those words weigh a ton.  And they are giving encouragement to people to do things — just as, remember, Charlottesville.  People were coming down that hill with tiki torches saying, 'The Jews will not replace us, the Jews will not replace us.'  And what was the President's statement?  'There are good people on both sides.'  Really?  'The Jews will not replace us,' and good people on both sides? 

This is an out-and-out Big Lie.  The original transcript shows absolutely that Trump was referring to people who had come to protest mob behavior and that he specifically and explicitly disavowed the white supremacists.

Dana Loesch reminded everyone that, while Pelosi was willing to lie about Trump, the most philo-Semitic president ever in the White House, it was Pelosi who sat by silently as members of her own party engaged in openly anti-Semitic behavior:

 

 

With this kind of open warfare coming on the heels of the Democrats' inability to remove him from office, no wonder Trump said Nancy Pelosi is a "horrible person."