Even Anderson Cooper's polite interview with Bernie reveals Bernie's extremism

Anderson Cooper did a decent-ish job on Sunday's 60 Minutes challenging some of Bernie's more extreme positions.  Despite Cooper's delicacy, Bernie gave away the fact that he dislikes America and dreams of Marxist socialism.

With Bernie now the frontrunner in the Democrat Party, it was natural that 60 Minutes would interview him.  In terms of real journalism, the interview is inadequate.  You'll get more information about Bernie's lifelong Marxism and love for dictators from the videos at the bottom of this post.  Still, there were illuminating moments.

Cooper's narrative reiterates that Sanders is now claiming Denmark, not Cuba or Venezuela, as his model.  It doesn't matter.  Denmark's reality is strikingly different from the myth.

Sanders, without evidence, calls Trump is a "pathological liar."  Untrue.  Trump is an exaggerator, Biden is a fabulist, and Bernie is the pathological liar.  Anyone who sells communism, as he has for decades, despite the 100 million dead bodies left behind in the 20th century alone, is lying at an almost incomprehensible scale.

Cooper did note that, in the 1980s, Sanders was a fan of the Soviet Union and the Sandinistas.  A brief video from the 1980s, interrupted by Cooper's voiceovers, has Bernie decrying the "authoritarian nature of Cuba" while lauding its "massive literacy program.  Is that a bad thing?"  Only a Marxist could value literacy over food and freedom.

When Cooper mentioned imprisoned dissidents, Sanders said, "[W]e condemn that" (apparently, being frontrunner allows you to use the royal "we").  He then attacked Trump for his practice of being nice to people with whom he's negotiating (e.g., Kim Jong-un and Putin).

Although Cooper dishonestly called Trump a racist, his question about the men's different views of America revealed Bernie's chronic disdain for America:

Cooper: Donald Trump got elected talking to white middle-class Americans, white working-class Americans, promising to — to make America great again. Your stump speech, your critics say sounds like nothing works in America, hasn't for generations. Is America great? [Editor: Cooper's saying Trump talked to white people is a lie. Trump talks to all Americans, and Americans of all colors are listening.]

Sanders: In many ways, we are. In some ways, very significant ways, we're not. We're not great when half of our people today are living paycheck to paycheck. When 500,000 people tonight are going to be sleeping out on the streets, including 30,000 veterans.

(As an aside, these problems are Democrat- and government-created.  The mentally ill are homeless because leftists closed down asylums.  Drug addicts crowd Democrat cities that give them food, shelter, and easy access to drugs and alcohol.  Poverty in the heartland resulted because Democrats and the Chamber of Commerce sold out American workers and because of Democrat climate policies shutting down businesses.)

Finally, Bernie revealed a mindset typical to those spending other people's money — he neither knows nor cares how much his plans cost:

Cooper: Two-thirds of Democrats in the Senate have not signed on to Medicare for All, which would cost an estimated $30 trillion to $40 trillion over ten years. And that's just one of Bernie Sanders' many proposals. There's also free public college, cancellation of all student debt, a federal job guarantee, and a Green New Deal to rapidly reduce carbon emissions.

How much will that cost?

Sanders: Obviously, those are expensive propositions, but we have done our best on issue after issue — in paying for them.

Cooper: Do you know how all — how much though? I mean, do you have a price tag for — for all of this?

Sanders: We do. I mean, you know, and — and — the price tag is — it will be substantially less than letting the current system go. I think it's about $30 trillion.

Cooper: That's just for Medicare for All, you're talking about?

Sanders: That's just Medicare for All, yes.

Cooper: Do you have — a price tag for all of these things?

Sanders: No, I don't. We try to — no, you mentioned making public colleges and universities tuition free and cancelling all student debt, that's correct. That's what I want to do. We pay for that through a modest tax on Wall Street speculation.

Cooper: But you say you don't know what the total price is, but you know how it's gonna be paid for. How do you know it's gonna be paid for if you don't know how much the price is?

Sanders: Well, I can't — you know, I can't rattle off to you ever nickel and every dime. But we have accounted for — you — you talked about Medicare for All. We have options out there that will pay for it.

Here's the real Bernie:

Anderson Cooper did a decent-ish job on Sunday's 60 Minutes challenging some of Bernie's more extreme positions.  Despite Cooper's delicacy, Bernie gave away the fact that he dislikes America and dreams of Marxist socialism.

With Bernie now the frontrunner in the Democrat Party, it was natural that 60 Minutes would interview him.  In terms of real journalism, the interview is inadequate.  You'll get more information about Bernie's lifelong Marxism and love for dictators from the videos at the bottom of this post.  Still, there were illuminating moments.

Cooper's narrative reiterates that Sanders is now claiming Denmark, not Cuba or Venezuela, as his model.  It doesn't matter.  Denmark's reality is strikingly different from the myth.

Sanders, without evidence, calls Trump is a "pathological liar."  Untrue.  Trump is an exaggerator, Biden is a fabulist, and Bernie is the pathological liar.  Anyone who sells communism, as he has for decades, despite the 100 million dead bodies left behind in the 20th century alone, is lying at an almost incomprehensible scale.

Cooper did note that, in the 1980s, Sanders was a fan of the Soviet Union and the Sandinistas.  A brief video from the 1980s, interrupted by Cooper's voiceovers, has Bernie decrying the "authoritarian nature of Cuba" while lauding its "massive literacy program.  Is that a bad thing?"  Only a Marxist could value literacy over food and freedom.

When Cooper mentioned imprisoned dissidents, Sanders said, "[W]e condemn that" (apparently, being frontrunner allows you to use the royal "we").  He then attacked Trump for his practice of being nice to people with whom he's negotiating (e.g., Kim Jong-un and Putin).

Although Cooper dishonestly called Trump a racist, his question about the men's different views of America revealed Bernie's chronic disdain for America:

Cooper: Donald Trump got elected talking to white middle-class Americans, white working-class Americans, promising to — to make America great again. Your stump speech, your critics say sounds like nothing works in America, hasn't for generations. Is America great? [Editor: Cooper's saying Trump talked to white people is a lie. Trump talks to all Americans, and Americans of all colors are listening.]

Sanders: In many ways, we are. In some ways, very significant ways, we're not. We're not great when half of our people today are living paycheck to paycheck. When 500,000 people tonight are going to be sleeping out on the streets, including 30,000 veterans.

(As an aside, these problems are Democrat- and government-created.  The mentally ill are homeless because leftists closed down asylums.  Drug addicts crowd Democrat cities that give them food, shelter, and easy access to drugs and alcohol.  Poverty in the heartland resulted because Democrats and the Chamber of Commerce sold out American workers and because of Democrat climate policies shutting down businesses.)

Finally, Bernie revealed a mindset typical to those spending other people's money — he neither knows nor cares how much his plans cost:

Cooper: Two-thirds of Democrats in the Senate have not signed on to Medicare for All, which would cost an estimated $30 trillion to $40 trillion over ten years. And that's just one of Bernie Sanders' many proposals. There's also free public college, cancellation of all student debt, a federal job guarantee, and a Green New Deal to rapidly reduce carbon emissions.

How much will that cost?

Sanders: Obviously, those are expensive propositions, but we have done our best on issue after issue — in paying for them.

Cooper: Do you know how all — how much though? I mean, do you have a price tag for — for all of this?

Sanders: We do. I mean, you know, and — and — the price tag is — it will be substantially less than letting the current system go. I think it's about $30 trillion.

Cooper: That's just for Medicare for All, you're talking about?

Sanders: That's just Medicare for All, yes.

Cooper: Do you have — a price tag for all of these things?

Sanders: No, I don't. We try to — no, you mentioned making public colleges and universities tuition free and cancelling all student debt, that's correct. That's what I want to do. We pay for that through a modest tax on Wall Street speculation.

Cooper: But you say you don't know what the total price is, but you know how it's gonna be paid for. How do you know it's gonna be paid for if you don't know how much the price is?

Sanders: Well, I can't — you know, I can't rattle off to you ever nickel and every dime. But we have accounted for — you — you talked about Medicare for All. We have options out there that will pay for it.

Here's the real Bernie: