Mitch McConnell playing hardball with Schumer on impeachment trial rules

Mitch McConnell is serving a heaping helping of sauce for the gander to Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer. Beth Baumann:

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on Tuesday said Senate Republicans may have to come together to pass a partisan set of rules for an impeachment trial if he cannot strike a deal with Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY).

If the two fail to come to an agreement on a set of parameters for the impeachment trial, McConnell is likely to go to the Republican caucus to see who would vote alongside him, The Hill reported. 

"It would depend on what we could agree to," McConnell said in reference to a bipartisan deal. "That failing, I would probably come back to my own members and say, 'OK, can 51 of us agree [on] how we're going to handle this?'"

The Senate used to be more like a club, where "comity" meant working together more than the fractious House of Representatives.  But Trump Derangement Syndrome has changed everything in D.C., including in both Houses of Congress.  Adam Schiff and Jerry ("I'm not going to take any s---") Nadler already have taken the lowest of political low roads in their approach to impeachment, so any expectations for a Senate impeachment trial being conducted by Marquess of Queensberry rules are misplaced.  Yes, Chief Justice Roberts will preside, but he will presumably follow the rules that the Senate votes.

And Mitch has just told Schumer that comity doesn't count for much anymore.

The Democrats' impeachment chickens are coming home to roost (hat tip: Rev. Jeremiah Wright):

I know it's easy to make fun of The Turtle.  But nobody wields a better stiletto in the Senate.

Caricature by Donkey Hotey (cropped).

Mitch McConnell is serving a heaping helping of sauce for the gander to Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer. Beth Baumann:

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on Tuesday said Senate Republicans may have to come together to pass a partisan set of rules for an impeachment trial if he cannot strike a deal with Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY).

If the two fail to come to an agreement on a set of parameters for the impeachment trial, McConnell is likely to go to the Republican caucus to see who would vote alongside him, The Hill reported. 

"It would depend on what we could agree to," McConnell said in reference to a bipartisan deal. "That failing, I would probably come back to my own members and say, 'OK, can 51 of us agree [on] how we're going to handle this?'"

The Senate used to be more like a club, where "comity" meant working together more than the fractious House of Representatives.  But Trump Derangement Syndrome has changed everything in D.C., including in both Houses of Congress.  Adam Schiff and Jerry ("I'm not going to take any s---") Nadler already have taken the lowest of political low roads in their approach to impeachment, so any expectations for a Senate impeachment trial being conducted by Marquess of Queensberry rules are misplaced.  Yes, Chief Justice Roberts will preside, but he will presumably follow the rules that the Senate votes.

And Mitch has just told Schumer that comity doesn't count for much anymore.

The Democrats' impeachment chickens are coming home to roost (hat tip: Rev. Jeremiah Wright):

I know it's easy to make fun of The Turtle.  But nobody wields a better stiletto in the Senate.

Caricature by Donkey Hotey (cropped).