Independent voters will carry Trump again in 2020

The independent voter was instrumental in pushing President Trump across the line in swing states in 2016.  Read a left-leaning publication, and you would think independents are all going to vote the Democratic ticket in the next presidential election.  Not true!  Independents will, by and large, vote for candidates that best represent their values, and those values cut across party lines.  Otherwise, they would not be independent voters.

Gallup polling reported in 2017 that 42% of Americans identified as independent.  But who is in the independent voting bloc?  By and large, the independent voter is a fiscal conservative and a social liberal.  The independent wants controlled spending but with compassion.  An independent voter votes issues rather than political ideology or partisanship.  He is a voter without longstanding loyalty to or association with a political party. 

Independents are also a hardy bunch.  Take for example the hardiest of all U.S. presidents, George Washington.  Washington was the only president elected as an independent.  He was not formally affiliated with a party during his two terms.  When I think of President Trump, what comes to mind is tough, resilient, strong, robust — the very definition of independent! 

What are the major demographics of an independent party voter?  Overall, 35% of white registered voters identify as independent.  Among Millennials (ages 18–35), 41% identify as independents.  The share of Millennials who identify as independent is up 8 points since 2008.  According to the Pew Research Center: "Among voters who do not affiliate with a religious group, 45% are independent."

Independents' votes generally reflect educated choices and free thinking.  Such Americans can see through the fake, the noisy, and the untrustworthy.

According to the National Election Pool exit poll Trump carried independents by 4 percentage points across the country in 2016.  But the Washington Post reported that in the important states, independents pulled him across the finish line.  For example, Trump won independents by 16 percentage points over Hillary Clinton in Michigan.  Three months ago, in the Post poll, former vice president Joe Biden was the only Democratic contender who beat Trump among independents in a theoretical head-to-head matchup. 

In a later survey the Post has, the 7-point lead was up to 17 points among independents.  It is unclear, however, if the Post was talking about independents or undeclared voters.  Conflating the two would skew and shed doubt on the Post's survey results.  Many voters remain undeclared until they get to the ballot box.

The left-leaning media will have you believe that independent voters are flocking to Democrats.  However, independents commonly cast ballots for both Democrats and Republicans.  According to the Pew Research Center, most independents lean toward one of the two major parties.  Thirty-four percent of independents say they approved of the way Donald Trump was handling his job as president in a March Pew Research Center survey

Regardless of the numbers, let's concede that, more than in 2016, some independents are trending toward Democratic contenders.  What does that mean for Trump?  With over ninety-five-percent negative major media coverage against Trump, are the independents being swayed?  Are the media winning?  Is Trump not getting his independent message out?  Or are the polls skewed and biased?  

Because independents are thoughtful and high-info voters, they will be considering questions like these: Am I working?  Is my pay higher?  Will I be taking home as much in my pay under a Trump presidency?  Will I pay more for less health care? 

Independent voters are more fiscally conservative than Democratic voters by and large.  More independents' household budgets are balanced.  In other words, independents spend less than they take in.  Makes sense, because a platform for independents is a balanced national budget.  A platform for left-leaning presidential candidates is more "investments" — that is, spending without regard to that thing called a budget.

Independents are too smart to be swayed by false news, skewed surveys, biased issue coverage, and Democratic hopefuls who run cities with high crime rates and runaway budgets and put their sons on the boards of corrupt foreign companies.  These are not the presidential contenders independents normally vote into office. 

The U.S. was built by independent thinkers who braved the high seas, a cold winter, no shelter, and nary a McDonald's for years to come.  Those are the kind of people who will carry us forward to elect Trump in 2020 despite an onslaught of negative media, misplaced priorities, and incompetent presidential hopefuls.

The independent voter was instrumental in pushing President Trump across the line in swing states in 2016.  Read a left-leaning publication, and you would think independents are all going to vote the Democratic ticket in the next presidential election.  Not true!  Independents will, by and large, vote for candidates that best represent their values, and those values cut across party lines.  Otherwise, they would not be independent voters.

Gallup polling reported in 2017 that 42% of Americans identified as independent.  But who is in the independent voting bloc?  By and large, the independent voter is a fiscal conservative and a social liberal.  The independent wants controlled spending but with compassion.  An independent voter votes issues rather than political ideology or partisanship.  He is a voter without longstanding loyalty to or association with a political party. 

Independents are also a hardy bunch.  Take for example the hardiest of all U.S. presidents, George Washington.  Washington was the only president elected as an independent.  He was not formally affiliated with a party during his two terms.  When I think of President Trump, what comes to mind is tough, resilient, strong, robust — the very definition of independent! 

What are the major demographics of an independent party voter?  Overall, 35% of white registered voters identify as independent.  Among Millennials (ages 18–35), 41% identify as independents.  The share of Millennials who identify as independent is up 8 points since 2008.  According to the Pew Research Center: "Among voters who do not affiliate with a religious group, 45% are independent."

Independents' votes generally reflect educated choices and free thinking.  Such Americans can see through the fake, the noisy, and the untrustworthy.

According to the National Election Pool exit poll Trump carried independents by 4 percentage points across the country in 2016.  But the Washington Post reported that in the important states, independents pulled him across the finish line.  For example, Trump won independents by 16 percentage points over Hillary Clinton in Michigan.  Three months ago, in the Post poll, former vice president Joe Biden was the only Democratic contender who beat Trump among independents in a theoretical head-to-head matchup. 

In a later survey the Post has, the 7-point lead was up to 17 points among independents.  It is unclear, however, if the Post was talking about independents or undeclared voters.  Conflating the two would skew and shed doubt on the Post's survey results.  Many voters remain undeclared until they get to the ballot box.

The left-leaning media will have you believe that independent voters are flocking to Democrats.  However, independents commonly cast ballots for both Democrats and Republicans.  According to the Pew Research Center, most independents lean toward one of the two major parties.  Thirty-four percent of independents say they approved of the way Donald Trump was handling his job as president in a March Pew Research Center survey

Regardless of the numbers, let's concede that, more than in 2016, some independents are trending toward Democratic contenders.  What does that mean for Trump?  With over ninety-five-percent negative major media coverage against Trump, are the independents being swayed?  Are the media winning?  Is Trump not getting his independent message out?  Or are the polls skewed and biased?  

Because independents are thoughtful and high-info voters, they will be considering questions like these: Am I working?  Is my pay higher?  Will I be taking home as much in my pay under a Trump presidency?  Will I pay more for less health care? 

Independent voters are more fiscally conservative than Democratic voters by and large.  More independents' household budgets are balanced.  In other words, independents spend less than they take in.  Makes sense, because a platform for independents is a balanced national budget.  A platform for left-leaning presidential candidates is more "investments" — that is, spending without regard to that thing called a budget.

Independents are too smart to be swayed by false news, skewed surveys, biased issue coverage, and Democratic hopefuls who run cities with high crime rates and runaway budgets and put their sons on the boards of corrupt foreign companies.  These are not the presidential contenders independents normally vote into office. 

The U.S. was built by independent thinkers who braved the high seas, a cold winter, no shelter, and nary a McDonald's for years to come.  Those are the kind of people who will carry us forward to elect Trump in 2020 despite an onslaught of negative media, misplaced priorities, and incompetent presidential hopefuls.