What Millennials don't get about America's economic pie

Fed a steady diet of economic lies by anti-capitalists in our society, the Millennial generation has been tricked into believing that the wealthy get rich only by stealing an oversized slice of America's economic pie.  By taking more than their fair share, the narrative goes, greedy corporate CEOs leave little but crumbs for everyone else.  Such fallacious thinking is referred to as the zero sum theory of economics, the idea that there's only one finite-sized pie to go around, and that one person taking a large slice means someone else will go hungry.

In truth, America does not have a finite economic pie.  Rather, it has a virtually unlimited supply of ever evolving economic pies of varying sizes waiting to be made by enterprising people of every race and every income group.

The biggest such pies are made by high-profile capitalists like Warren Buffett, a Democrat, and Charles Koch, a Republican, both of whom generously share their self-created economic pies not only with a myriad of charitable organizations, but also with hundreds of thousands of well paid employees who eagerly work for their thriving corporate empires.

Millions of other economic pies are made by less famous job-creators, those whose small businesses provide more than 80% of America's private sector employment.  Still more economic pies are made by the 160 million people who constitute the backbone of our economy, men and women who earn a slice of their country's widespread prosperity simply by getting up and going to work so they can provide for themselves and their families by working hard and learning to live within their means.

Unfortunately, there will always be some who habitually make bad decisions, financial or otherwise.  Frustrated that self-created problems have kept them from participating in the American dream, they bitterly complain that someone else made off with their share of the pie.  With nothing but crumbs on their plates, these economically ignorant people are prime targets of the party whose election success depends upon inciting class hatred, the means of gaining political power outlined in an 1848 manuscript titled The Communist Manifesto.

A new poll commissioned by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation found that 70% of Millennials are likely to vote for a socialist in 2020.  Since socialism-loving Millennials are so obsessed with wealth disparity, here are a few questions for them:

● If wealth disparity is a bad thing, can aggrieved Millennials explain why so many filthy rich Democrats — Nancy Pelosi, John Kerry, Oprah, Al Gore, the Clintons, the Obamas, etc. — selfishly cling to the lion's share of their enviable fortunes, rather than giving away, say, 80% of what they have to the poor?

● Can Millennials explain how corporate CEOs are any more to blame for wealth disparity than the filthy rich Democrats named above?

● Can they explain how society is hurt when wealthy job-creators like Warren Buffett and Charles Koch use their accumulated capital to create even more good-paying jobs?

If Millennials troubled by wealth inequality reflect on those questions, they will (1) stop blaming others and get to work on a plan for earning a share of their country's bountiful prosperity and (2) realize that the party telling them that socialism will make their lives better is playing them for fools.

Millennials might want to read this Jewish World Review article about the unmitigated havoc socialism has inflicted on country after country after country.  The next election will determine whether our two-party constitutional republic survives or falls from within to single-party socialist rule.

An electrical engineering graduate of Georgia Tech and now retired, John Eidson is a freelance writer in Atlanta.

Fed a steady diet of economic lies by anti-capitalists in our society, the Millennial generation has been tricked into believing that the wealthy get rich only by stealing an oversized slice of America's economic pie.  By taking more than their fair share, the narrative goes, greedy corporate CEOs leave little but crumbs for everyone else.  Such fallacious thinking is referred to as the zero sum theory of economics, the idea that there's only one finite-sized pie to go around, and that one person taking a large slice means someone else will go hungry.

In truth, America does not have a finite economic pie.  Rather, it has a virtually unlimited supply of ever evolving economic pies of varying sizes waiting to be made by enterprising people of every race and every income group.

The biggest such pies are made by high-profile capitalists like Warren Buffett, a Democrat, and Charles Koch, a Republican, both of whom generously share their self-created economic pies not only with a myriad of charitable organizations, but also with hundreds of thousands of well paid employees who eagerly work for their thriving corporate empires.

Millions of other economic pies are made by less famous job-creators, those whose small businesses provide more than 80% of America's private sector employment.  Still more economic pies are made by the 160 million people who constitute the backbone of our economy, men and women who earn a slice of their country's widespread prosperity simply by getting up and going to work so they can provide for themselves and their families by working hard and learning to live within their means.

Unfortunately, there will always be some who habitually make bad decisions, financial or otherwise.  Frustrated that self-created problems have kept them from participating in the American dream, they bitterly complain that someone else made off with their share of the pie.  With nothing but crumbs on their plates, these economically ignorant people are prime targets of the party whose election success depends upon inciting class hatred, the means of gaining political power outlined in an 1848 manuscript titled The Communist Manifesto.

A new poll commissioned by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation found that 70% of Millennials are likely to vote for a socialist in 2020.  Since socialism-loving Millennials are so obsessed with wealth disparity, here are a few questions for them:

● If wealth disparity is a bad thing, can aggrieved Millennials explain why so many filthy rich Democrats — Nancy Pelosi, John Kerry, Oprah, Al Gore, the Clintons, the Obamas, etc. — selfishly cling to the lion's share of their enviable fortunes, rather than giving away, say, 80% of what they have to the poor?

● Can Millennials explain how corporate CEOs are any more to blame for wealth disparity than the filthy rich Democrats named above?

● Can they explain how society is hurt when wealthy job-creators like Warren Buffett and Charles Koch use their accumulated capital to create even more good-paying jobs?

If Millennials troubled by wealth inequality reflect on those questions, they will (1) stop blaming others and get to work on a plan for earning a share of their country's bountiful prosperity and (2) realize that the party telling them that socialism will make their lives better is playing them for fools.

Millennials might want to read this Jewish World Review article about the unmitigated havoc socialism has inflicted on country after country after country.  The next election will determine whether our two-party constitutional republic survives or falls from within to single-party socialist rule.

An electrical engineering graduate of Georgia Tech and now retired, John Eidson is a freelance writer in Atlanta.