Sprite ad celebrates parents helping kids be transgenders

The revolutionary Left has captured control of not just education, media, and nonprofits; it holds considerable sway over advertising, an industry that used to be regarded with contempt by Marxists for creating unnecessary desires solely to fatten the wallets of capitalists.  And if a Marxist were to rank capitalism's sins for pushing unhealthful products, near the top would have to be sugary soft drinks, which, however refreshing, do fatten people up with "empty calories" and spend an inordinate share of costs on packaging and distribution.

But it does appear that Sprite, a sugary soft drink produced by the Coca-Cola Company, is spending some of its advertising budget on promoting parents encouraging their children to be transgendered, the latest campaign being pushed by the cultural Left, part of the campaign to deconstruct the very foundations of society so as to clear the way for the construction of a new social order, a "new man," as Marxists used to say before gender itself became an oppressive feature of capitalist society.

This social media video comes from Argentina last week, just before Buenos Aires held its Pride Week (hat tip: Breitbart):

Dr. Susan Berry summarizes its storyline:

The video captures somewhat playful glances between the mothers and their gender dysphoric children.

The mothers of boys are seen in the ad applying makeup and dressing their sons in feminine attire as they smile at each other. The mothers of girls are viewed binding the breasts of their daughters to help them appear as males. A grandmother teasingly helps her grandson dress in drag. (snip)

The video depicts children preparing a rainbow flag for the Pride event as they embrace LGBT family members. Parents appear to send their LGBT children off to the event in a celebratory manner.

The ad concludes with, "Orgullo: Lo que sentís cuando alguien que querés elige ser feliz," which translates to "Pride: what you feel when someone you love chooses to be happy," and "No estás solx," or "You're not alone."

Activist Mommy analyzes the motives likely at work, which are ideological, not commercial:

A common tactic of major companies like Sprite is to use emotional advertising like this to make those who are LGBT-identifying feel good about their lifestyle while simultaneously making those who disagree with the LGBT lifestyle appear to be cold-hearted, uncompassionate, and hateful.  This is an artificial juxtaposition contrived to bring divide and further polarize the opposing sides of the culture war. Sprite is essentially saying "if you aren't like these people in the video you aren't loving[.]"

Somewhere in the vast Coca-Cola global empire, decision-makers concluded that this message is good for their company's fortunes, and worth spending shareholders' money on.  Is it the goodwill of the tiny fraction of the population of Argentina that identifies as transgender?  Somehow, I suspect not.  My guess is that they want to impress a broader segment of young people with how progressive and woke Sprite is, despite being sugar water in expensive packaging.  Or maybe they just are currying favor in the advertising and media worlds, where the "long march through the institutions" has been so effective.

The revolutionary Left has captured control of not just education, media, and nonprofits; it holds considerable sway over advertising, an industry that used to be regarded with contempt by Marxists for creating unnecessary desires solely to fatten the wallets of capitalists.  And if a Marxist were to rank capitalism's sins for pushing unhealthful products, near the top would have to be sugary soft drinks, which, however refreshing, do fatten people up with "empty calories" and spend an inordinate share of costs on packaging and distribution.

But it does appear that Sprite, a sugary soft drink produced by the Coca-Cola Company, is spending some of its advertising budget on promoting parents encouraging their children to be transgendered, the latest campaign being pushed by the cultural Left, part of the campaign to deconstruct the very foundations of society so as to clear the way for the construction of a new social order, a "new man," as Marxists used to say before gender itself became an oppressive feature of capitalist society.

This social media video comes from Argentina last week, just before Buenos Aires held its Pride Week (hat tip: Breitbart):

Dr. Susan Berry summarizes its storyline:

The video captures somewhat playful glances between the mothers and their gender dysphoric children.

The mothers of boys are seen in the ad applying makeup and dressing their sons in feminine attire as they smile at each other. The mothers of girls are viewed binding the breasts of their daughters to help them appear as males. A grandmother teasingly helps her grandson dress in drag. (snip)

The video depicts children preparing a rainbow flag for the Pride event as they embrace LGBT family members. Parents appear to send their LGBT children off to the event in a celebratory manner.

The ad concludes with, "Orgullo: Lo que sentís cuando alguien que querés elige ser feliz," which translates to "Pride: what you feel when someone you love chooses to be happy," and "No estás solx," or "You're not alone."

Activist Mommy analyzes the motives likely at work, which are ideological, not commercial:

A common tactic of major companies like Sprite is to use emotional advertising like this to make those who are LGBT-identifying feel good about their lifestyle while simultaneously making those who disagree with the LGBT lifestyle appear to be cold-hearted, uncompassionate, and hateful.  This is an artificial juxtaposition contrived to bring divide and further polarize the opposing sides of the culture war. Sprite is essentially saying "if you aren't like these people in the video you aren't loving[.]"

Somewhere in the vast Coca-Cola global empire, decision-makers concluded that this message is good for their company's fortunes, and worth spending shareholders' money on.  Is it the goodwill of the tiny fraction of the population of Argentina that identifies as transgender?  Somehow, I suspect not.  My guess is that they want to impress a broader segment of young people with how progressive and woke Sprite is, despite being sugar water in expensive packaging.  Or maybe they just are currying favor in the advertising and media worlds, where the "long march through the institutions" has been so effective.