Trump's UN speeches really beat Obama's, don't they?

Speaking to the United Nations General Assembly this week, President Donald J. Trump stood solidly on the side of those who believe in national sovereignty.

He said:

America is governed by Americans. We reject the ideology of globalism, and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism.

Around the world, responsible nations must defend against threats to sovereignty not just from global governance, but also from other, new forms of coercion and domination.

This is in stark contrast to the last U.N. General Assembly speech by his predecessor, President Barack H. Obama.  He said:

And so I believe that at this moment we all face a choice. We can choose to press forward with a better model of cooperation and integration.  Or we can retreat into a world sharply divided, and ultimately in conflict, along age-old lines of nation and tribe and race and religion. ...

Here’s the most important fact: The integration of our global economy has made life better for billions of men, women and children.  Over the last 25 years, the number of people living in extreme poverty has been cut from nearly 40 percent of humanity to under 10 percent.  That’s unprecedented.  And it’s not an abstraction. It means children have enough to eat; mothers don’t die in childbirth.

President Obama spoke for the world's billions of men, women, and children.  Trump spoke for millions of Americans.  He said:

The United States lost over 3 million manufacturing jobs, nearly a quarter of all steel jobs, and 60,000 factories after China joined the WTO.  And we have racked up $13 trillion in trade deficits over the last two decades.

But those days are over.  We will no longer tolerate such abuse.  We will not allow our workers to be victimized, our companies to be cheated, and our wealth to be plundered and transferred.  America will never apologize for protecting its citizens.

In a little over one year, Americans will go to the polls, choosing between these two views of their people in the world.

We know on whose side the current president is.

Speaking to the United Nations General Assembly this week, President Donald J. Trump stood solidly on the side of those who believe in national sovereignty.

He said:

America is governed by Americans. We reject the ideology of globalism, and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism.

Around the world, responsible nations must defend against threats to sovereignty not just from global governance, but also from other, new forms of coercion and domination.

This is in stark contrast to the last U.N. General Assembly speech by his predecessor, President Barack H. Obama.  He said:

And so I believe that at this moment we all face a choice. We can choose to press forward with a better model of cooperation and integration.  Or we can retreat into a world sharply divided, and ultimately in conflict, along age-old lines of nation and tribe and race and religion. ...

Here’s the most important fact: The integration of our global economy has made life better for billions of men, women and children.  Over the last 25 years, the number of people living in extreme poverty has been cut from nearly 40 percent of humanity to under 10 percent.  That’s unprecedented.  And it’s not an abstraction. It means children have enough to eat; mothers don’t die in childbirth.

President Obama spoke for the world's billions of men, women, and children.  Trump spoke for millions of Americans.  He said:

The United States lost over 3 million manufacturing jobs, nearly a quarter of all steel jobs, and 60,000 factories after China joined the WTO.  And we have racked up $13 trillion in trade deficits over the last two decades.

But those days are over.  We will no longer tolerate such abuse.  We will not allow our workers to be victimized, our companies to be cheated, and our wealth to be plundered and transferred.  America will never apologize for protecting its citizens.

In a little over one year, Americans will go to the polls, choosing between these two views of their people in the world.

We know on whose side the current president is.