Even 12-year-olds want out of Venezuela

A few years ago, a Cuban cyclist in the Pan American Games was competing and suddenly made a turn the other way.  What happened?  Did he get confused with the route?  No — he rushed to a foreign embassy and sought asylum.

Others have defected over the years, especially those in baseball, because they travel more often.

We learned that several Venezuelan players wanted to stay, too.  I mean 12-year-old Little Leaguers:

"When I arrived in the United States I was impressed," said outfielder Eduar Pinto, 12, who enjoyed going out to eat and playing in the game room in the team's dorm in Williamsport.

"When the time came to return, I didn't want to come back. I wanted to stay there."

The young boys did go back.  I'm sure the adults supervising the young team made sure that everyone was in the plane to Maracaibo.

Nevertheless, the boys expressed some incredible statements about life in Venezuela today:

"The ballplayers over there (in the U.S.) are fat, and they're not tired," Salcedo said, alluding to Venezuela's growing problems stemming from malnutrition and hunger.

I guess these young boys know what socialism really is.  Maybe they should chat with the young people who buy into the promises of Sanders and Warren.

As my late father used to say, the best way to understand socialism is to talk to someone who lives under socialism!

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

A few years ago, a Cuban cyclist in the Pan American Games was competing and suddenly made a turn the other way.  What happened?  Did he get confused with the route?  No — he rushed to a foreign embassy and sought asylum.

Others have defected over the years, especially those in baseball, because they travel more often.

We learned that several Venezuelan players wanted to stay, too.  I mean 12-year-old Little Leaguers:

"When I arrived in the United States I was impressed," said outfielder Eduar Pinto, 12, who enjoyed going out to eat and playing in the game room in the team's dorm in Williamsport.

"When the time came to return, I didn't want to come back. I wanted to stay there."

The young boys did go back.  I'm sure the adults supervising the young team made sure that everyone was in the plane to Maracaibo.

Nevertheless, the boys expressed some incredible statements about life in Venezuela today:

"The ballplayers over there (in the U.S.) are fat, and they're not tired," Salcedo said, alluding to Venezuela's growing problems stemming from malnutrition and hunger.

I guess these young boys know what socialism really is.  Maybe they should chat with the young people who buy into the promises of Sanders and Warren.

As my late father used to say, the best way to understand socialism is to talk to someone who lives under socialism!

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.