Release the prison surveillance footage

I never thought I'd see the day we all unanimously demand further answers about a dead pedophile.  But nobody is buying the conventional explanation for Jeffrey Epstein's death in New York City's Metropolitan Correctional Center.

Nearly all irregularities in the case have one thing in common, and that is their reliance on another human's word.  We're getting all of our information by taking the word of the guards, the warden, the medical examiner, the prison nurse, and so on.

All of these irregularities require a human to provide us the information we seek — all but one.

The cameras.

If the sleeping guards, falsified documents, and abrupt removal from suicide watch weren't enough, the "malfunctioning camera" in Epstein's cell during his death sealed the deal.  Cameras tell the story without humans.  Cameras don't lie.

It's a strong likelihood that we will never see what happened on the inside of that jail cell, but it doesn't end there.  Every correctional institution in the country surveils virtually every inch of the place 24/7, especially maximum security facilities like Rikers.

Even if we must accept the "dog ate my homework" excuse for Epstein's cell footage, we can still likely connect several dots if given access to other surveillance footage from the prison.

If the guards were sleeping, show us the time-lapse.  Show us Epstein walking around the most recent time he left his cell.  Show us who went in and out of that cell for the last 12 hours.  Corroborate all testimony from each party involved with any footage available relating to their story.

If the conventional explanation is indeed what took the life of Epstein, releasing all of the footage available should be a priority.

This case is teeming with vicious conspiracy theories, and that would clear many of them up.  Most of the footage will be entirely dull and uneventful if all conventional explanations are credible.

Bobby Harr is an independent journalist and freelance writer who has been featured in the Western Journal, American Thinker, and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

I never thought I'd see the day we all unanimously demand further answers about a dead pedophile.  But nobody is buying the conventional explanation for Jeffrey Epstein's death in New York City's Metropolitan Correctional Center.

Nearly all irregularities in the case have one thing in common, and that is their reliance on another human's word.  We're getting all of our information by taking the word of the guards, the warden, the medical examiner, the prison nurse, and so on.

All of these irregularities require a human to provide us the information we seek — all but one.

The cameras.

If the sleeping guards, falsified documents, and abrupt removal from suicide watch weren't enough, the "malfunctioning camera" in Epstein's cell during his death sealed the deal.  Cameras tell the story without humans.  Cameras don't lie.

It's a strong likelihood that we will never see what happened on the inside of that jail cell, but it doesn't end there.  Every correctional institution in the country surveils virtually every inch of the place 24/7, especially maximum security facilities like Rikers.

Even if we must accept the "dog ate my homework" excuse for Epstein's cell footage, we can still likely connect several dots if given access to other surveillance footage from the prison.

If the guards were sleeping, show us the time-lapse.  Show us Epstein walking around the most recent time he left his cell.  Show us who went in and out of that cell for the last 12 hours.  Corroborate all testimony from each party involved with any footage available relating to their story.

If the conventional explanation is indeed what took the life of Epstein, releasing all of the footage available should be a priority.

This case is teeming with vicious conspiracy theories, and that would clear many of them up.  Most of the footage will be entirely dull and uneventful if all conventional explanations are credible.

Bobby Harr is an independent journalist and freelance writer who has been featured in the Western Journal, American Thinker, and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.