You can't help almost feeling bad for Robert Mueller

Robert Mueller, it seems, was willingly used by Democrats to lend credence to an outrage of an investigation.  If yesterday's hearings did nothing else, they raised question as to the level of Mueller's involvement in the investigation and report that bear his name.

One would be hard pressed in watching his committee performance to make the argument that Mueller had even read the full report.  How is it possible that after presiding over a 22-month investigation into all things Russia and Trump, the special counsel could profess ignorance of the role of Fusion GPS in providing the faulty premises on which his investigation was based?

If Mueller's main purpose in accepting the position of special counsel was to provide the appearance of integrity, fairness, impartiality, and gravitas, he bludgeoned those concepts by allowing Andrew Weissmann, a mendacious and highly partisan former prosecutor, to select a staff of Clinton donors, defenders, and supporters to conduct the investigation.

If Mueller was more of a figurehead than leader of an investigation conducted by rabidly partisan Democrats, then it is clearer than ever that there was no evidence linking Donald Trump or his presidential campaign to corruption or collusion with Russian interests.  Indeed, it is surprising that Trump, with his flamboyant lifestyle, business manipulations, and ethical lapses not only wasn't indicted, but was given near exoneration on complicity with Russia.  It must have greatly pained the investigators to admit their lack of evidence.

The big losers in the special counsel investigation and in yesterday's congressional hearings were Democrats; the anti-Trump media; and, perhaps most of all, the formerly respected Robert Mueller.  I almost feel sympathy for him.

Image: James Ledbetter via Flickr.

Robert Mueller, it seems, was willingly used by Democrats to lend credence to an outrage of an investigation.  If yesterday's hearings did nothing else, they raised question as to the level of Mueller's involvement in the investigation and report that bear his name.

One would be hard pressed in watching his committee performance to make the argument that Mueller had even read the full report.  How is it possible that after presiding over a 22-month investigation into all things Russia and Trump, the special counsel could profess ignorance of the role of Fusion GPS in providing the faulty premises on which his investigation was based?

If Mueller's main purpose in accepting the position of special counsel was to provide the appearance of integrity, fairness, impartiality, and gravitas, he bludgeoned those concepts by allowing Andrew Weissmann, a mendacious and highly partisan former prosecutor, to select a staff of Clinton donors, defenders, and supporters to conduct the investigation.

If Mueller was more of a figurehead than leader of an investigation conducted by rabidly partisan Democrats, then it is clearer than ever that there was no evidence linking Donald Trump or his presidential campaign to corruption or collusion with Russian interests.  Indeed, it is surprising that Trump, with his flamboyant lifestyle, business manipulations, and ethical lapses not only wasn't indicted, but was given near exoneration on complicity with Russia.  It must have greatly pained the investigators to admit their lack of evidence.

The big losers in the special counsel investigation and in yesterday's congressional hearings were Democrats; the anti-Trump media; and, perhaps most of all, the formerly respected Robert Mueller.  I almost feel sympathy for him.

Image: James Ledbetter via Flickr.