What's 60 Minutes' problem with Big Oil?

Like the lefty investigative outfit ProPublica, 60 Minutes seems to have a programmed agenda to take down Big Oil.

You could see it in its choice of six segments last night, at least three of which drummed on the wickedness of Big Oil and the importance of getting it out of the picture, which is half its content.  And oh, how creative they were — sending the same message, but in so many different ways.

First, there was an awful segment about kids suing the government over global warming, blaming Big Oil exclusively and wanting the government to pull contracts with it.  The youngsters were obviously being manipulated by larger activist forces and were inarticulate and withdrawn, as kids are, about their cause for the camera.  Some left-wing lawyer was behind the whole thing and was obviously exploiting the kids for the purpose of getting this junk science institutionalized and into the courts, targeting Big Oil.  The segment reported the whole thing as though it were something with merit instead of the leftist machinery of the leftist courts doing its thing, looking for new kinds of power to seize.  Anyone watching would have thought the latter and seen the manipulation and wondered why the vaunted investigative reporting outfit didn't ask questions about this whole setup.  They just went cheerleading instead.  For the Earth.

Second, there was a segment about Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, with a rerun of one of her past interviews and a bit of updating afterward.  Naturally, it had a big chunk about her Green New Deal and, again, the wickedness of Big Oil and the ease of switching to her green plan instead since the whole thing was "a revolution."  Ocasio-Cortez came off as clueless about how she really meant to make this happen, assuming she'd be able to seize the power to do it.  Call it a public relations segment for a crackpot with an anti–Big Oil agenda.  And man, it was tired.

Third, there was a segment about an eccentric inventor who, in his musings at Walden Pond, had found a way to convert plant matter into a kind of sugar, which could be used for fuel.  It was said to be better than ethanol, it was a sugar that wouldn't rot your teeth, and it could save the Earth as a form of fuel with no reconfiguring the gas stations or refineries.  But not a word about whether stripping the Earth of its greenery is a better idea than drilling a tiny hole in the earth for energy sources or whether it was a more efficient form of energy as oil or nuclear energy are.  The man had attracted lots of investment for his projects and drawn Washington Swamp Things in the revolving door lobby such as William Perry, Steve Chu, and George Schultz to his board.  Not a word about that tired setup.  It was telling that the men refused to say the scheme could fully replace Big Oil.  What it looked like was an ad for the new energy, in the hopes that it could put Big Oil out of business.

What does 60 Minutes have against Big Oil?  It's obvious there's an agenda with so many different creative ways to take down the oil industry.  Big Oil is getting it on all sides from these people.  

Is someone on the top telling them to do this?  I hunted and found no evidence — the company is self-titled on the New York Stock Exchange, and its controlling shareholder is Sumner Redstone, whose charities and investments don't show any green orientation.  Maybe there are executives there with green investments or something. 

But most likely, it's just them being left-wing, recognizing that the base source of President Trump's extraordinary economy is in its energy production, something that has surpassed the top oil-producers now and put petro-tyrants out of business.

It was so much nicer when America was oil-dependent and found itself stuck with the listless Obama economy, is that it?  The oil base has got to be bothering the leftists, given what it's doing to President Trump's re-election prospects.

I see an agenda, all right, and I'm going to be looking for more of it.  It's unseemly for a news organization to be doing this, and it doesn't make 60 Minutes look good.

Like the lefty investigative outfit ProPublica, 60 Minutes seems to have a programmed agenda to take down Big Oil.

You could see it in its choice of six segments last night, at least three of which drummed on the wickedness of Big Oil and the importance of getting it out of the picture, which is half its content.  And oh, how creative they were — sending the same message, but in so many different ways.

First, there was an awful segment about kids suing the government over global warming, blaming Big Oil exclusively and wanting the government to pull contracts with it.  The youngsters were obviously being manipulated by larger activist forces and were inarticulate and withdrawn, as kids are, about their cause for the camera.  Some left-wing lawyer was behind the whole thing and was obviously exploiting the kids for the purpose of getting this junk science institutionalized and into the courts, targeting Big Oil.  The segment reported the whole thing as though it were something with merit instead of the leftist machinery of the leftist courts doing its thing, looking for new kinds of power to seize.  Anyone watching would have thought the latter and seen the manipulation and wondered why the vaunted investigative reporting outfit didn't ask questions about this whole setup.  They just went cheerleading instead.  For the Earth.

Second, there was a segment about Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, with a rerun of one of her past interviews and a bit of updating afterward.  Naturally, it had a big chunk about her Green New Deal and, again, the wickedness of Big Oil and the ease of switching to her green plan instead since the whole thing was "a revolution."  Ocasio-Cortez came off as clueless about how she really meant to make this happen, assuming she'd be able to seize the power to do it.  Call it a public relations segment for a crackpot with an anti–Big Oil agenda.  And man, it was tired.

Third, there was a segment about an eccentric inventor who, in his musings at Walden Pond, had found a way to convert plant matter into a kind of sugar, which could be used for fuel.  It was said to be better than ethanol, it was a sugar that wouldn't rot your teeth, and it could save the Earth as a form of fuel with no reconfiguring the gas stations or refineries.  But not a word about whether stripping the Earth of its greenery is a better idea than drilling a tiny hole in the earth for energy sources or whether it was a more efficient form of energy as oil or nuclear energy are.  The man had attracted lots of investment for his projects and drawn Washington Swamp Things in the revolving door lobby such as William Perry, Steve Chu, and George Schultz to his board.  Not a word about that tired setup.  It was telling that the men refused to say the scheme could fully replace Big Oil.  What it looked like was an ad for the new energy, in the hopes that it could put Big Oil out of business.

What does 60 Minutes have against Big Oil?  It's obvious there's an agenda with so many different creative ways to take down the oil industry.  Big Oil is getting it on all sides from these people.  

Is someone on the top telling them to do this?  I hunted and found no evidence — the company is self-titled on the New York Stock Exchange, and its controlling shareholder is Sumner Redstone, whose charities and investments don't show any green orientation.  Maybe there are executives there with green investments or something. 

But most likely, it's just them being left-wing, recognizing that the base source of President Trump's extraordinary economy is in its energy production, something that has surpassed the top oil-producers now and put petro-tyrants out of business.

It was so much nicer when America was oil-dependent and found itself stuck with the listless Obama economy, is that it?  The oil base has got to be bothering the leftists, given what it's doing to President Trump's re-election prospects.

I see an agenda, all right, and I'm going to be looking for more of it.  It's unseemly for a news organization to be doing this, and it doesn't make 60 Minutes look good.