Trey Gowdy reveals 'game changer' FBI transcript exists

The attempted entrapment of George Papadopoulos by the FBI and possibly the CIA, apparently as an excuse to trigger surveillance of the Trump presidential campaign, may turn into the "smoking gun" that exposes the depth of corruption of the Deep State Russia Hoax.  Trey Gowdy, the retired congressman from South Carolina, was, until 2018, chairman of the House Oversight and Investigations Committee, who was able to view classified information uncovered by the GOP congressional investigations when the party enjoyed a majority in the House of Representatives.

He is constrained as to what he can reveal about those documents, but yesterday, speaking with Maria Bartiromo on her Sunday-morning FNC program, Sunday Morning Futures (which has become essential viewing for keeping up with emerging developments in the Russia Hoax), he revealed the existence of transcripts that could be game-changers.

Here is a partial transcript, via Conservative Treehouse, followed by the video clip:

Bartiromo: I'm really glad you brought that up; the FBI agents' discussion with George Papadopoulos. Because when the FBI sends in informants to someone they're looking at, typically those conversations are recorded right? Those people are wired?

Gowdy: Yeah, I mean if the bureau is going to send an informant in, the informant is going to be wired; and if the bureau is monitoring telephone calls there's going to be a transcript of that.

And some of us have been fortunate enough to know whether or not those transcripts exist; but they haven't been made public and I think one in-particular is going – it has the potential to actually persuade people.  Very little in this Russia probe I'm afraid is going to persuade people who hate Trump, or who love Trump, but there is some information in these transcripts that I think has the potential to be a game-changer if it's ever made public.

Bartiromo: You say that's exculpatory evidence and when people see that they're going to say: wait, why wasn't this presented to the court earlier?

Gowdy: Yeah, you know, Johnny Ratcliffe is rightfully exercised over the obligations that the government has to tell the whole truth to the court when you are seeking permission to spy, or do surveillance, on an American.  And part of that includes the responsibility of providing exculpatory information, or information that tends to show the person did not do something wrong.  If you have exculpatory information, and you don't share it with the court, that ain't good.  I've seen it, Johnny's seen it, I'd love for your viewers to see it.

Image credit: YouTube screen grab.

Hat tip: Roger Luchs. 

The attempted entrapment of George Papadopoulos by the FBI and possibly the CIA, apparently as an excuse to trigger surveillance of the Trump presidential campaign, may turn into the "smoking gun" that exposes the depth of corruption of the Deep State Russia Hoax.  Trey Gowdy, the retired congressman from South Carolina, was, until 2018, chairman of the House Oversight and Investigations Committee, who was able to view classified information uncovered by the GOP congressional investigations when the party enjoyed a majority in the House of Representatives.

He is constrained as to what he can reveal about those documents, but yesterday, speaking with Maria Bartiromo on her Sunday-morning FNC program, Sunday Morning Futures (which has become essential viewing for keeping up with emerging developments in the Russia Hoax), he revealed the existence of transcripts that could be game-changers.

Here is a partial transcript, via Conservative Treehouse, followed by the video clip:

Bartiromo: I'm really glad you brought that up; the FBI agents' discussion with George Papadopoulos. Because when the FBI sends in informants to someone they're looking at, typically those conversations are recorded right? Those people are wired?

Gowdy: Yeah, I mean if the bureau is going to send an informant in, the informant is going to be wired; and if the bureau is monitoring telephone calls there's going to be a transcript of that.

And some of us have been fortunate enough to know whether or not those transcripts exist; but they haven't been made public and I think one in-particular is going – it has the potential to actually persuade people.  Very little in this Russia probe I'm afraid is going to persuade people who hate Trump, or who love Trump, but there is some information in these transcripts that I think has the potential to be a game-changer if it's ever made public.

Bartiromo: You say that's exculpatory evidence and when people see that they're going to say: wait, why wasn't this presented to the court earlier?

Gowdy: Yeah, you know, Johnny Ratcliffe is rightfully exercised over the obligations that the government has to tell the whole truth to the court when you are seeking permission to spy, or do surveillance, on an American.  And part of that includes the responsibility of providing exculpatory information, or information that tends to show the person did not do something wrong.  If you have exculpatory information, and you don't share it with the court, that ain't good.  I've seen it, Johnny's seen it, I'd love for your viewers to see it.

Image credit: YouTube screen grab.

Hat tip: Roger Luchs.