Doomed by reality

I sigh when I read of the policy endorsements of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez . I find her hard to listen to, with her tweenage speech patterns (e.g., "tippy top"), no matter what she says, but I try to listen.  After all, sometimes wise ideas can come from babes and fools.  Stopped clocks and all that.  She seems anxious that the reality of climate change is going to kill many of us, so we have to do something right now!

She obviously has no appreciation for actual reality, as opposed to politically useful fiction.  The reality is that even if the climate changes so that the upper Midwest of the United States develops a climate like that currently experienced in Hawaii, people would still find a way to live there.  Life is tenacious.  We might be eating different varieties of vegetables that were more heat-tolerant, but we'd still have food, lots of it.  What about places farther south?  Again, they would still have food, just different species.  Life adapts to climate.  Given water (even if it comes from melting polar caps) and air (including carbon dioxide), plants will grow.  If a warmer climate is the worry, relax.  We'll be fine.  We might run the air-conditioners more, but we could start building nuclear reactors for energy, and it wouldn't be a big deal.  Nuclear reactors have never been safer.  We could also build and sell air-conditioning to people living in jungles and deserts.  The world will not have to pack up and move to the American heartland to avoid drowning.

What if the world is getting cooler?  I find that more plausible.  We can build greenhouses and hydroponic farms, using plentiful nuclear energy to power the heat.  Those who are less hardy to cold temperatures may want to move farther south.  I wonder how the third-world countries will feel about northern climate refugees, considering we seem to be expected to welcome them if the climate warms.  People do live in colder parts of the world.  The Inuit, for example.  They survive not strictly because of possible DNA adaptations, but by developing skills that work for the environment they inhabit.  We can learn those same skills.

Even if all the people were to die, the planet would not be destroyed by a few degrees of temperature swing, not by extreme weather.  It has been here for billions of years (unless you're a young earther, in which case you probably figure God has a plan for the whole climate change thing, if it actually happens).  It was allegedly molten at one point, totally ice-covered at another point.  People have lived near volcanoes and on coastlines, even after experiencing eruptions and tsunamis, choosing to accept the risk rather than move somewhere else.

I wouldn't miss airplanes personally, as I don't use them most of the time and could probably drive anywhere I want to go.  A Trans Arctic Highway could be built, leading to the settlement of another extreme environment.  (Maybe it would be cold enough that conservatives could move there to get away from human snowflakes.)  But getting rid of cows?  That's a bridge too far.  I am not giving up butter, cheese, pizza, lasagna, milk, quesadillas, etc. any more than I'm going to give up bacon.  That's not who I am.  I might tolerate the rest of the GND, but not the elimination of cows.

Sandy O is surprisingly indifferent to the price tag for her green energy dreams, as well as their impracticability.  As with her socialist dreams, perhaps she should find a place that is practicing what she advises already so we can see what it looks like — a microcosm of the way she wants us to live, with a budget showing how it was accomplished.

I sigh when I read of the policy endorsements of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez . I find her hard to listen to, with her tweenage speech patterns (e.g., "tippy top"), no matter what she says, but I try to listen.  After all, sometimes wise ideas can come from babes and fools.  Stopped clocks and all that.  She seems anxious that the reality of climate change is going to kill many of us, so we have to do something right now!

She obviously has no appreciation for actual reality, as opposed to politically useful fiction.  The reality is that even if the climate changes so that the upper Midwest of the United States develops a climate like that currently experienced in Hawaii, people would still find a way to live there.  Life is tenacious.  We might be eating different varieties of vegetables that were more heat-tolerant, but we'd still have food, lots of it.  What about places farther south?  Again, they would still have food, just different species.  Life adapts to climate.  Given water (even if it comes from melting polar caps) and air (including carbon dioxide), plants will grow.  If a warmer climate is the worry, relax.  We'll be fine.  We might run the air-conditioners more, but we could start building nuclear reactors for energy, and it wouldn't be a big deal.  Nuclear reactors have never been safer.  We could also build and sell air-conditioning to people living in jungles and deserts.  The world will not have to pack up and move to the American heartland to avoid drowning.

What if the world is getting cooler?  I find that more plausible.  We can build greenhouses and hydroponic farms, using plentiful nuclear energy to power the heat.  Those who are less hardy to cold temperatures may want to move farther south.  I wonder how the third-world countries will feel about northern climate refugees, considering we seem to be expected to welcome them if the climate warms.  People do live in colder parts of the world.  The Inuit, for example.  They survive not strictly because of possible DNA adaptations, but by developing skills that work for the environment they inhabit.  We can learn those same skills.

Even if all the people were to die, the planet would not be destroyed by a few degrees of temperature swing, not by extreme weather.  It has been here for billions of years (unless you're a young earther, in which case you probably figure God has a plan for the whole climate change thing, if it actually happens).  It was allegedly molten at one point, totally ice-covered at another point.  People have lived near volcanoes and on coastlines, even after experiencing eruptions and tsunamis, choosing to accept the risk rather than move somewhere else.

I wouldn't miss airplanes personally, as I don't use them most of the time and could probably drive anywhere I want to go.  A Trans Arctic Highway could be built, leading to the settlement of another extreme environment.  (Maybe it would be cold enough that conservatives could move there to get away from human snowflakes.)  But getting rid of cows?  That's a bridge too far.  I am not giving up butter, cheese, pizza, lasagna, milk, quesadillas, etc. any more than I'm going to give up bacon.  That's not who I am.  I might tolerate the rest of the GND, but not the elimination of cows.

Sandy O is surprisingly indifferent to the price tag for her green energy dreams, as well as their impracticability.  As with her socialist dreams, perhaps she should find a place that is practicing what she advises already so we can see what it looks like — a microcosm of the way she wants us to live, with a budget showing how it was accomplished.