Saints-Rams game: A microcosm?

By now, even many of those who are disinterested in sports have heard of the controversy in the National Football League (NFL) concerning an error by a referee that probably changed the outcome of a championship game, likely costing the New Orleans Saints their berth in the Super Bowl.  Winning that final game of the season confers upon the victor the crown of glory in professional American football.  Instead, the semi-final game was won by the Los Angeles Rams, who will play in the Super Bowl against the New England Patriots.

On film, the referee's mistake is so blatant that it beggars the imagination to propose an innocent explanation.  Many fans honestly believe that there is corruption involved, corruption of a magnitude that has not occurred since the 1919 World Series of baseball, in which some players accepted bribes in return for deliberately losing the tournament.  In the 2019 football game almost a century later, it has seriously been suggested that the uppermost management in the NFL decided that the conference championship games should be weighted in favor of the two teams with the largest markets.  This, it is theorized (and it is only that, a theory), would make the Super Bowl more profitable for the league's owners.

All of this comes on the heels of another controversy in the NFL, in which many of its players showed open disrespect for the National Anthem, the anthem played at every NFL game.  Note also that there are now suggestions that the anthem no longer be played in professional sports.

These three factors may not in themselves be of overbearing national importance.  But, in a sense, they form a model of how corruption can occur in high places and go unpunished.  The Office of Special Counsel, headed by Robert Mueller, is conducting a campaign against the supporters and confidants of President Trump that is at least as biased, and at least as blatant, as what many believe is displayed on the NFL film.

In a contest that dwarfs the Super Bowl in importance, Team Clinton was clearly favored by the top leaders in the Department of (so-called) Justice over Team Trump.  It is there for every objective observer to see.  While Mueller investigates imaginary crimes of which Trump is innocent, Hillary Clinton's outrageous violations of law were covered up by former FBI director James Comey.  It beggars the imagination to propose an innocent explanation for this obvious bias.

Yet the Mueller officiating crew marches forward, arrogantly defying congressional oversight, trampling the Constitution, and oppressing people for committing the sort of procedural crimes that are rarely punished with such severity in other cases.  Not one person from Team Clinton has received so much as a slap on the wrist for far worse crimes.

Having said all this, there is one glaring difference between the eventual NFL championship team and Team Clinton: Hillary did not win.  Thank God.

By now, even many of those who are disinterested in sports have heard of the controversy in the National Football League (NFL) concerning an error by a referee that probably changed the outcome of a championship game, likely costing the New Orleans Saints their berth in the Super Bowl.  Winning that final game of the season confers upon the victor the crown of glory in professional American football.  Instead, the semi-final game was won by the Los Angeles Rams, who will play in the Super Bowl against the New England Patriots.

On film, the referee's mistake is so blatant that it beggars the imagination to propose an innocent explanation.  Many fans honestly believe that there is corruption involved, corruption of a magnitude that has not occurred since the 1919 World Series of baseball, in which some players accepted bribes in return for deliberately losing the tournament.  In the 2019 football game almost a century later, it has seriously been suggested that the uppermost management in the NFL decided that the conference championship games should be weighted in favor of the two teams with the largest markets.  This, it is theorized (and it is only that, a theory), would make the Super Bowl more profitable for the league's owners.

All of this comes on the heels of another controversy in the NFL, in which many of its players showed open disrespect for the National Anthem, the anthem played at every NFL game.  Note also that there are now suggestions that the anthem no longer be played in professional sports.

These three factors may not in themselves be of overbearing national importance.  But, in a sense, they form a model of how corruption can occur in high places and go unpunished.  The Office of Special Counsel, headed by Robert Mueller, is conducting a campaign against the supporters and confidants of President Trump that is at least as biased, and at least as blatant, as what many believe is displayed on the NFL film.

In a contest that dwarfs the Super Bowl in importance, Team Clinton was clearly favored by the top leaders in the Department of (so-called) Justice over Team Trump.  It is there for every objective observer to see.  While Mueller investigates imaginary crimes of which Trump is innocent, Hillary Clinton's outrageous violations of law were covered up by former FBI director James Comey.  It beggars the imagination to propose an innocent explanation for this obvious bias.

Yet the Mueller officiating crew marches forward, arrogantly defying congressional oversight, trampling the Constitution, and oppressing people for committing the sort of procedural crimes that are rarely punished with such severity in other cases.  Not one person from Team Clinton has received so much as a slap on the wrist for far worse crimes.

Having said all this, there is one glaring difference between the eventual NFL championship team and Team Clinton: Hillary did not win.  Thank God.