Rep. Dan Crenshaw shows class...again

Rep. Dan Crenshaw, who has already demonstrated to us what he's made of, first through his elite Navy SEAL service to the U.S., which included significant war injuries, and then his magnanimous behavior toward a 25-year old Saturday Night Live comic who mocked his war wounds, is showing his class once again.  Here's the story of their next encounter from Fox News:

Texas Rep.-elect Dan Crenshaw said he called Pete Davidson after hearing about the disturbing social media message the "Saturday Night Live" star posted over the weekend.

Crenshaw, the former Navy SEAL who wears an eyepatch on his right eye after he was injured by an I.E.D. in Afghanistan, was mocked by Davidson on "SNL" in November.  Crenshaw told KPRC Houston (via The Hollywood Reporter) that he reached out to the star after seeing the 25-year-old's social media message.

"I talked to him personally [Sunday]," he said.  "We don't go back very far.  We're not good friends.  But, I think he appreciated hearing from me.  I told him everyone had a purpose in this world.  God put you here for a reason.  It's your job to find that purpose.  And you should live that way."

The guy hasn't even been sworn in as a Texas congressman, and already we are seeing two examples of magnanimous behavior from him toward an antagonist in what are obviously testing conditions.

The poor little fellow, Pete Davidson, who has great comic gifts yet was so down in the dumps that he sounded as if he wanted to commit suicide in a social media post, got an unprompted phone call from Crenshaw, helping him to get perspective on his life and to make it worth living.  Since many comics and other artists (think Robin Williams) are depression-prone, that was a supreme act of kindness.  What a wonderful gift for the young man, and from a guy Davidson had unthinkingly mocked for his disfiguring service injuries.

In doing this, not only did Crenshaw project himself to be stoic and masculine, the way dads used to be before the political correctness era (he mentioned that SEALs don't get offended earlier), but he also projected that most valued element of masculinity, which is strength.  Only the strong can project magnanimity.  Weak people are incapable of it.

One can hope that that phone call helped him, and the young man gets the help he needs.  I'd hate to see him "disappear from the earth," given how bright and talented he is.  Nobody should end it all, even if he isn't bright and talented.

As for Crenshaw, one can only imagine that his wisdom is the result of not just coming from good people, but also his perspectives obtained as an elite serviceman and patriot, forged in the heat of battle.  If so, that reveals to us two things: that there are extraordinarily strong, kind, and magnanimous people in our service ranks, and that Crenshaw is going to be one hell of a good and wise congressman and, quite possibly, someone more of us will be delighted to elect to higher office.  Personal character is just the start.

Texans have found a diamond.

Image credit: Screen grab from Texas Business Radio via Vimeo.

Rep. Dan Crenshaw, who has already demonstrated to us what he's made of, first through his elite Navy SEAL service to the U.S., which included significant war injuries, and then his magnanimous behavior toward a 25-year old Saturday Night Live comic who mocked his war wounds, is showing his class once again.  Here's the story of their next encounter from Fox News:

Texas Rep.-elect Dan Crenshaw said he called Pete Davidson after hearing about the disturbing social media message the "Saturday Night Live" star posted over the weekend.

Crenshaw, the former Navy SEAL who wears an eyepatch on his right eye after he was injured by an I.E.D. in Afghanistan, was mocked by Davidson on "SNL" in November.  Crenshaw told KPRC Houston (via The Hollywood Reporter) that he reached out to the star after seeing the 25-year-old's social media message.

"I talked to him personally [Sunday]," he said.  "We don't go back very far.  We're not good friends.  But, I think he appreciated hearing from me.  I told him everyone had a purpose in this world.  God put you here for a reason.  It's your job to find that purpose.  And you should live that way."

The guy hasn't even been sworn in as a Texas congressman, and already we are seeing two examples of magnanimous behavior from him toward an antagonist in what are obviously testing conditions.

The poor little fellow, Pete Davidson, who has great comic gifts yet was so down in the dumps that he sounded as if he wanted to commit suicide in a social media post, got an unprompted phone call from Crenshaw, helping him to get perspective on his life and to make it worth living.  Since many comics and other artists (think Robin Williams) are depression-prone, that was a supreme act of kindness.  What a wonderful gift for the young man, and from a guy Davidson had unthinkingly mocked for his disfiguring service injuries.

In doing this, not only did Crenshaw project himself to be stoic and masculine, the way dads used to be before the political correctness era (he mentioned that SEALs don't get offended earlier), but he also projected that most valued element of masculinity, which is strength.  Only the strong can project magnanimity.  Weak people are incapable of it.

One can hope that that phone call helped him, and the young man gets the help he needs.  I'd hate to see him "disappear from the earth," given how bright and talented he is.  Nobody should end it all, even if he isn't bright and talented.

As for Crenshaw, one can only imagine that his wisdom is the result of not just coming from good people, but also his perspectives obtained as an elite serviceman and patriot, forged in the heat of battle.  If so, that reveals to us two things: that there are extraordinarily strong, kind, and magnanimous people in our service ranks, and that Crenshaw is going to be one hell of a good and wise congressman and, quite possibly, someone more of us will be delighted to elect to higher office.  Personal character is just the start.

Texans have found a diamond.

Image credit: Screen grab from Texas Business Radio via Vimeo.