Miss Universe opts to stay in the beauty contest business

Looks as though political correctness lost one at the Miss Universe pageant.

Catriona Gray of the Philippines was crowned Miss Universe 2018 at the final on Sunday in Bangkok, beating out two lovely women from South Africa and Venezuela.

I would have picked South Africa myself, but oh, am I happy that Miss Philippines won.  Lovely contestant, happy to cheer Miss Philippines, she's a fine choice.

The problem this time around has been that the contest has started to become a venue for transsexuals, who look every bit like the imitation of women that they actually are.

Sure, Miss Universe permits plastic surgery.  But plastic surgery can't do much about DNA, and that was obvious in the contestant from Spain being touted in the press as a likely winner, in addition to being this great "barrier breaker" and "trailblazer" and all that.  "Miss" Spain didn't even make the top 20.

But there was this big buildup in the press about the person, much of which obviously was intended to pressure the judges to vote for the contestant.

Look at all these headlines that ran before the contest:

Aiming for Miss Universe – and Universal Transgender Rights –New York Times

Miss Universe's first transgender contestant aims to be a role model for trans kids –USA Today

Transgender contestant shatters Miss Universe barriers –Montreal Gazette

'Transgender' beauty queen favored to win Miss Universe contest: 'Trans women' are women' –LifeSite (This one isn't left-wing; it just gives the flavor of the "narrative" out there.)

A transgender contestant is favored to win Miss Universe. Cue the conservative outrage. –Think Progress

Spanish transgender beauty queen says winning this year's Miss Universe contest would be 'a victory for human rights' as some bookmakers make her the favorite –Daily Mail

Well, it didn't happen.  The person didn't even place in the top 20.  Oh, and don't think the contest was immune to the winds of political correctness – the judging panel was all female, reportedly as a nod to #MeToo.

So what we saw was women not all that impressed with imitation women taking the crown, much as they have taken so many of the medals in women's sports.  Men, after all, are competitive, and some don't seem to lose that, even with surgery.  That a man could outdo a woman at being a woman is frankly at odds with reality, given that imitation men are referencing what they see in women first before assuming their new and womanish identities.  In any case, based on the pictures, I can tell I'm seeing a man who's dressed up like a woman.  There is a significant strain of feminism out there that does refuse to accept "transgender women" as what they call themselves because it's simply not true.

What does that mean for Miss Universe?  Well, mainly that it wants to stay in business.  The Miss America Organization embraced political correctness, eliminating the swimsuit competition, and went downhill from there.  Feminine charms were kind of outlawed, and women were masculinized in the name of career-seeking, which is basically what happened.

Miss Universe mainly exists as a marketing organization, and its prime accent is on beauty.  The aim there is to find someone within the top 1% of beauty (and all of those contestants, save one, did make the 1%) who can market the organization to the world, keeping the contest thing going and the public entertained.

Would a transgender candidate be able to carry that off in the age of political correctness?  Well, the person would draw a lot of press, which is important, but whether it would be the right kind of press is another matter.  The contest would soon become a draw for drag queens, and the same thing would happen to Miss Universe as happened to Miss America and the Boy Scouts after embracing political correctness.

They said "no thanks," ever so world-peacey-like, in the beauty contest tradition, and went on with what they do best, keeping the organization alive at least for now.

Image credit: Miss Universe via YouTube screen grab.

Looks as though political correctness lost one at the Miss Universe pageant.

Catriona Gray of the Philippines was crowned Miss Universe 2018 at the final on Sunday in Bangkok, beating out two lovely women from South Africa and Venezuela.

I would have picked South Africa myself, but oh, am I happy that Miss Philippines won.  Lovely contestant, happy to cheer Miss Philippines, she's a fine choice.

The problem this time around has been that the contest has started to become a venue for transsexuals, who look every bit like the imitation of women that they actually are.

Sure, Miss Universe permits plastic surgery.  But plastic surgery can't do much about DNA, and that was obvious in the contestant from Spain being touted in the press as a likely winner, in addition to being this great "barrier breaker" and "trailblazer" and all that.  "Miss" Spain didn't even make the top 20.

But there was this big buildup in the press about the person, much of which obviously was intended to pressure the judges to vote for the contestant.

Look at all these headlines that ran before the contest:

Aiming for Miss Universe – and Universal Transgender Rights –New York Times

Miss Universe's first transgender contestant aims to be a role model for trans kids –USA Today

Transgender contestant shatters Miss Universe barriers –Montreal Gazette

'Transgender' beauty queen favored to win Miss Universe contest: 'Trans women' are women' –LifeSite (This one isn't left-wing; it just gives the flavor of the "narrative" out there.)

A transgender contestant is favored to win Miss Universe. Cue the conservative outrage. –Think Progress

Spanish transgender beauty queen says winning this year's Miss Universe contest would be 'a victory for human rights' as some bookmakers make her the favorite –Daily Mail

Well, it didn't happen.  The person didn't even place in the top 20.  Oh, and don't think the contest was immune to the winds of political correctness – the judging panel was all female, reportedly as a nod to #MeToo.

So what we saw was women not all that impressed with imitation women taking the crown, much as they have taken so many of the medals in women's sports.  Men, after all, are competitive, and some don't seem to lose that, even with surgery.  That a man could outdo a woman at being a woman is frankly at odds with reality, given that imitation men are referencing what they see in women first before assuming their new and womanish identities.  In any case, based on the pictures, I can tell I'm seeing a man who's dressed up like a woman.  There is a significant strain of feminism out there that does refuse to accept "transgender women" as what they call themselves because it's simply not true.

What does that mean for Miss Universe?  Well, mainly that it wants to stay in business.  The Miss America Organization embraced political correctness, eliminating the swimsuit competition, and went downhill from there.  Feminine charms were kind of outlawed, and women were masculinized in the name of career-seeking, which is basically what happened.

Miss Universe mainly exists as a marketing organization, and its prime accent is on beauty.  The aim there is to find someone within the top 1% of beauty (and all of those contestants, save one, did make the 1%) who can market the organization to the world, keeping the contest thing going and the public entertained.

Would a transgender candidate be able to carry that off in the age of political correctness?  Well, the person would draw a lot of press, which is important, but whether it would be the right kind of press is another matter.  The contest would soon become a draw for drag queens, and the same thing would happen to Miss Universe as happened to Miss America and the Boy Scouts after embracing political correctness.

They said "no thanks," ever so world-peacey-like, in the beauty contest tradition, and went on with what they do best, keeping the organization alive at least for now.

Image credit: Miss Universe via YouTube screen grab.