Yes, I believe in science, but not all scientists

One of the most annoying slanders of conservatives by leftists is the claim that we do not believe in science.  In my Berkeley neighborhood full of virtue-signaling progressives, I walk by this proclamation implying that science is part of a package of SJW beliefs.

As many others have quipped, belief in the scientific method and its fruits is quite different from believing every scientist's claims.  After all, many of the slurs directed at conservatives over believing science are hurled at us because we question the conclusions of those who proclaim that man-made global warming threatens to incinerate the planet's inhabitants.  That is a conclusion not experimentally verified; rather, it is based on computer models that have had a poor track record in predicting the future.

Now comes yet another stream of scandals involving ethically questionable scientists.  The French news agency AFP reports:

Three prominent US scientists have been pushed to resign over the past 10 days after damning revelations about their methods, a sign of greater vigilance and decreasing tolerance for misconduct within the research community.

The most spectacular fall concerned Jose Baselga, chief medical officer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.  He authored hundreds of articles on cancer research.

Investigative journalism group ProPublica and The New York Times revealed on September 8 that Baselga failed to disclose in dozens of research articles that he had received millions of dollars from pharmaceutical and medical companies.

Such declarations are generally required by scientific journals.

Links between a doctor leading a clinical trial and manufacturers of drugs or medical equipment used in the study can influence the methodology and ultimately the results.

But journals don't themselves verify the thoroughness of an author's declarations.

Caught up in the scandal, Baselga resigned on September 13.

Next came the case of Brian Wansink, director of the Food and Brand Lab at the prestigious Cornell University.

He made his name thanks to studies that garnered plenty of media attention, including on pizza, and the appetites of children.

His troubles began last year when scientific sleuths discovered anomalies and surprisingly positive results in dozens of his articles. ...

In the final case, Gilbert Welch, a professor of public health at Dartmouth College, resigned last week.

The university accused him of plagiarism in an article published in The New England Journal of Medicine, the most respected American medical journal.

Actually, by confusing scientists with science itself and ignoring the actual scientific method, the left makes a mockery of the foundations of our modern civilization.

Hat tip: Bryan Demko

One of the most annoying slanders of conservatives by leftists is the claim that we do not believe in science.  In my Berkeley neighborhood full of virtue-signaling progressives, I walk by this proclamation implying that science is part of a package of SJW beliefs.

As many others have quipped, belief in the scientific method and its fruits is quite different from believing every scientist's claims.  After all, many of the slurs directed at conservatives over believing science are hurled at us because we question the conclusions of those who proclaim that man-made global warming threatens to incinerate the planet's inhabitants.  That is a conclusion not experimentally verified; rather, it is based on computer models that have had a poor track record in predicting the future.

Now comes yet another stream of scandals involving ethically questionable scientists.  The French news agency AFP reports:

Three prominent US scientists have been pushed to resign over the past 10 days after damning revelations about their methods, a sign of greater vigilance and decreasing tolerance for misconduct within the research community.

The most spectacular fall concerned Jose Baselga, chief medical officer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.  He authored hundreds of articles on cancer research.

Investigative journalism group ProPublica and The New York Times revealed on September 8 that Baselga failed to disclose in dozens of research articles that he had received millions of dollars from pharmaceutical and medical companies.

Such declarations are generally required by scientific journals.

Links between a doctor leading a clinical trial and manufacturers of drugs or medical equipment used in the study can influence the methodology and ultimately the results.

But journals don't themselves verify the thoroughness of an author's declarations.

Caught up in the scandal, Baselga resigned on September 13.

Next came the case of Brian Wansink, director of the Food and Brand Lab at the prestigious Cornell University.

He made his name thanks to studies that garnered plenty of media attention, including on pizza, and the appetites of children.

His troubles began last year when scientific sleuths discovered anomalies and surprisingly positive results in dozens of his articles. ...

In the final case, Gilbert Welch, a professor of public health at Dartmouth College, resigned last week.

The university accused him of plagiarism in an article published in The New England Journal of Medicine, the most respected American medical journal.

Actually, by confusing scientists with science itself and ignoring the actual scientific method, the left makes a mockery of the foundations of our modern civilization.

Hat tip: Bryan Demko