Spot the companies that oppose your values

Owing to the dominance of leftists throughout academia and the media, many corporations have caved in to, or willingly adopted, the values of the progressive left.  Institutions respond to other institutions more than to individuals, which is why so many ostensible beneficiaries of free markets end up supporting leftist causes.

Pretty much everyone that cares understands that Starbucks, with its infamous, counterproductive "talk about race" initiative, is progressive in outlook.  But many other companies quietly donate to the Southern Poverty Law Center or other leftist groups without much public awareness.

My friend who blogs under the name Bookworm, at the eponymous Bookworm Room website, has done us all a favor by collecting a database now exceeding 7,000 companies and their political positions and values.  The website What Business Thinks has made this database easily accessible for you as you shop either online or at stores.

Bookworm writes:

The site works well on both computers and mobile devices.  Using What Business Thinks, consumers can quickly find whether a business is aligned with their values or hostile to them.  This is the kind of information consumers should have before spending their money.

The site also has a companion blog in which I spell out in greater detail the information I'm steadily adding to the database.  If you follow the blog, you can keep up with developments in the business world.

Because there's more information out there than any one person can find, making What Business Thinks a continuing work in progress, the site also has a User Submission page that allows people to update old information, correct bad information, or introduce entirely new information – provided that it's well-sourced.

I urge you to check it out.  I will be consulting it often as I spend my hard-earned money.

Owing to the dominance of leftists throughout academia and the media, many corporations have caved in to, or willingly adopted, the values of the progressive left.  Institutions respond to other institutions more than to individuals, which is why so many ostensible beneficiaries of free markets end up supporting leftist causes.

Pretty much everyone that cares understands that Starbucks, with its infamous, counterproductive "talk about race" initiative, is progressive in outlook.  But many other companies quietly donate to the Southern Poverty Law Center or other leftist groups without much public awareness.

My friend who blogs under the name Bookworm, at the eponymous Bookworm Room website, has done us all a favor by collecting a database now exceeding 7,000 companies and their political positions and values.  The website What Business Thinks has made this database easily accessible for you as you shop either online or at stores.

Bookworm writes:

The site works well on both computers and mobile devices.  Using What Business Thinks, consumers can quickly find whether a business is aligned with their values or hostile to them.  This is the kind of information consumers should have before spending their money.

The site also has a companion blog in which I spell out in greater detail the information I'm steadily adding to the database.  If you follow the blog, you can keep up with developments in the business world.

Because there's more information out there than any one person can find, making What Business Thinks a continuing work in progress, the site also has a User Submission page that allows people to update old information, correct bad information, or introduce entirely new information – provided that it's well-sourced.

I urge you to check it out.  I will be consulting it often as I spend my hard-earned money.