Speaking of 'Hispanos'...

Even since the Texas primary runoff, I've been wondering about the Hispanic vote.  Back on May 22, a Hispanic woman running for governor in a runoff resulted in the lowest turnout since 1920.  "No muy bueno," as we say in Spanish.

In other words, are Hispanics going to show up in 2018?  It looks as though I'm not the only one asking that question.  Let's check out Ronald Brownstein:

Democrats have hit an unexpected speed bump in their drive to regain control of Congress: unsettling signs that the party may not generate as much turnout or support among Latino voters this fall as it expected.

Despite a procession of provocations from President Donald Trump – from ending deportation protections for so-called "Dreamers," young immigrants [sic] brought to the country illegally by their parents, to his now-terminated policy that resulted in children being separated from their undocumented [sic] parents at the border – a growing number of Democratic strategists are privately concerned that their candidates are not consolidating Latino support as much as they anticipated in several key races.

While cautioning that there is still time to reverse the trend, they point to signs of wavering Hispanic support and engagement in House districts in Texas, Nevada, Florida and California, and in Senate races in Texas, Nevada, Florida and Arizona.

I agree that there is still time to turn this around.  At the same time, the apathy could get worse with more time.

There are two problems.

First, the economy for Hispanics is working out well.  Unemployment is low.  Prospects are good.  Jobs are the best medicine to tune out the guy crying wolf.

Second, you need a better message than repeating over and over what then-candidate Trump said about "rapists."  I agree that Trump could have used better language, but how much longer are they going to sing that song?

We will wait and see for the voters to answer our questions in November.  I agree with Brownstein that Democrats need to give Hispanics some new material or face low turnout.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

Even since the Texas primary runoff, I've been wondering about the Hispanic vote.  Back on May 22, a Hispanic woman running for governor in a runoff resulted in the lowest turnout since 1920.  "No muy bueno," as we say in Spanish.

In other words, are Hispanics going to show up in 2018?  It looks as though I'm not the only one asking that question.  Let's check out Ronald Brownstein:

Democrats have hit an unexpected speed bump in their drive to regain control of Congress: unsettling signs that the party may not generate as much turnout or support among Latino voters this fall as it expected.

Despite a procession of provocations from President Donald Trump – from ending deportation protections for so-called "Dreamers," young immigrants [sic] brought to the country illegally by their parents, to his now-terminated policy that resulted in children being separated from their undocumented [sic] parents at the border – a growing number of Democratic strategists are privately concerned that their candidates are not consolidating Latino support as much as they anticipated in several key races.

While cautioning that there is still time to reverse the trend, they point to signs of wavering Hispanic support and engagement in House districts in Texas, Nevada, Florida and California, and in Senate races in Texas, Nevada, Florida and Arizona.

I agree that there is still time to turn this around.  At the same time, the apathy could get worse with more time.

There are two problems.

First, the economy for Hispanics is working out well.  Unemployment is low.  Prospects are good.  Jobs are the best medicine to tune out the guy crying wolf.

Second, you need a better message than repeating over and over what then-candidate Trump said about "rapists."  I agree that Trump could have used better language, but how much longer are they going to sing that song?

We will wait and see for the voters to answer our questions in November.  I agree with Brownstein that Democrats need to give Hispanics some new material or face low turnout.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.