Judicial nominee pulled because of opposition to 'multiculturalism'

President Trump was forced to pull the nomination of Ryan Bounds for a federal circuit judgeship on the Ninth Circuit because of the judge's writings decades ago against so-called "multiculturalism" while a student at Stanford.  GOP senators Tim Scott and Marco Rubio objected to the nominee's writings.

The Senate's only black Republican, Tim Scott of South Carolina, had concerns about those writings and Mr. Bounds's inability to clarify how his thinking had changed since then, according to a Senate Republican aide.  At least one other Republican, Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, agreed to join Mr. Scott in opposition to Mr. Bounds's nomination, according to another Republican aide.

Let's look at some of Bounds's writings:

In one of his Stanford articles, Bounds described a phenomenon he called "race-think," in which "multiculturalistas" and ethnic minorities bonded together to form groups of "racial purity" that he claimed ended up creating more division.

That's correct.  Multiculturalism is often a code word for blaming white people for the ills of society, attributing the lack of progress of minorities to their "victim" status.  Even when it is a celebration of other culture, it is not the American culture.  The American culture is Western culture.  It is derived from the white Europeans who originally settled this country.  Our Western culture is so highly prized that it is the reason why so many people from failed cultures in Africa, failed cultures in Central and South America, and failed cultures in Asia are flocking to come here.

"During my years in our Multicultural Garden of Eden," he wrote, "I have often marveled at the odd strategies that some of the more strident racial factions of the student body employ in their attempts to 'heighten consciousness,' 'build tolerance,' 'promote diversity' and otherwise convince us to partake of that fruit which promises to open our eyes to a PC version of the knowledge of good and evil.  I am mystified because these tactics seem always to contribute more to restricting consciousness, aggravating intolerance and pigeonholing cultural identities than many a Nazi bookburning."

I would never make comparisons to the Nazi era, but otherwise, Bounds is basically correct.  The efforts at "diversity" are more often than not about promoting resentment toward white people and Western culture.

 In another article, he urged the university not to lower the burden of proof in finding accused rapists in violation of university policy, writing that "there is nothing really inherently wrong with the University failing to punish an alleged rapist – regardless of his guilt – in the absence of adequate certainty[.]"

Uh-oh!  Bounds said a student accused of rape shouldn't be punished unless the university is reasonably certain he committed a crime!  It's funny how liberals are the first to advocate for criminals, and reducing the standards of what constitutes the crime, unless the crime is saying something that offends minorities, or having sex with a woman who later decides she retroactively didn't intend to.  (Rape does occasionally happen on college campuses, but lower standards of guilt have swept up the dolphins with the tuna.)

In a third article he mocked the importance of "Sensitivity" and the university's decision to make all students undergo mandatory sensitivity training after an LGBT statue was vandalized.

Wow, this really brings me back.  Remember when the gay rights movement was only four letters long?

Bounds's legal philosophy – a strict reading of the Constitution – has often been compared to ... late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and his successor, Justice Neil M. Gorsuch. 

So, thank you, Senator Scott and Senator Rubio, for saving us from this nominee, who would have strictly interpreted the Constitution.  Thanks to your actions, the Ninth Circuit continues to be a "safe space" for socialism, ethnic Balkanism, and other fashionable liberal "isms." and not a few "asms" as well.

Ed Straker is the senior writer at Newsmachete.com.

President Trump was forced to pull the nomination of Ryan Bounds for a federal circuit judgeship on the Ninth Circuit because of the judge's writings decades ago against so-called "multiculturalism" while a student at Stanford.  GOP senators Tim Scott and Marco Rubio objected to the nominee's writings.

The Senate's only black Republican, Tim Scott of South Carolina, had concerns about those writings and Mr. Bounds's inability to clarify how his thinking had changed since then, according to a Senate Republican aide.  At least one other Republican, Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, agreed to join Mr. Scott in opposition to Mr. Bounds's nomination, according to another Republican aide.

Let's look at some of Bounds's writings:

In one of his Stanford articles, Bounds described a phenomenon he called "race-think," in which "multiculturalistas" and ethnic minorities bonded together to form groups of "racial purity" that he claimed ended up creating more division.

That's correct.  Multiculturalism is often a code word for blaming white people for the ills of society, attributing the lack of progress of minorities to their "victim" status.  Even when it is a celebration of other culture, it is not the American culture.  The American culture is Western culture.  It is derived from the white Europeans who originally settled this country.  Our Western culture is so highly prized that it is the reason why so many people from failed cultures in Africa, failed cultures in Central and South America, and failed cultures in Asia are flocking to come here.

"During my years in our Multicultural Garden of Eden," he wrote, "I have often marveled at the odd strategies that some of the more strident racial factions of the student body employ in their attempts to 'heighten consciousness,' 'build tolerance,' 'promote diversity' and otherwise convince us to partake of that fruit which promises to open our eyes to a PC version of the knowledge of good and evil.  I am mystified because these tactics seem always to contribute more to restricting consciousness, aggravating intolerance and pigeonholing cultural identities than many a Nazi bookburning."

I would never make comparisons to the Nazi era, but otherwise, Bounds is basically correct.  The efforts at "diversity" are more often than not about promoting resentment toward white people and Western culture.

 In another article, he urged the university not to lower the burden of proof in finding accused rapists in violation of university policy, writing that "there is nothing really inherently wrong with the University failing to punish an alleged rapist – regardless of his guilt – in the absence of adequate certainty[.]"

Uh-oh!  Bounds said a student accused of rape shouldn't be punished unless the university is reasonably certain he committed a crime!  It's funny how liberals are the first to advocate for criminals, and reducing the standards of what constitutes the crime, unless the crime is saying something that offends minorities, or having sex with a woman who later decides she retroactively didn't intend to.  (Rape does occasionally happen on college campuses, but lower standards of guilt have swept up the dolphins with the tuna.)

In a third article he mocked the importance of "Sensitivity" and the university's decision to make all students undergo mandatory sensitivity training after an LGBT statue was vandalized.

Wow, this really brings me back.  Remember when the gay rights movement was only four letters long?

Bounds's legal philosophy – a strict reading of the Constitution – has often been compared to ... late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and his successor, Justice Neil M. Gorsuch. 

So, thank you, Senator Scott and Senator Rubio, for saving us from this nominee, who would have strictly interpreted the Constitution.  Thanks to your actions, the Ninth Circuit continues to be a "safe space" for socialism, ethnic Balkanism, and other fashionable liberal "isms." and not a few "asms" as well.

Ed Straker is the senior writer at Newsmachete.com.