Is that a catheter bag under Hillary Clinton's loose clothing?

Hot summer day, and Hillary Clinton was spotted again at a public speaking event, wearing voluminous clothes - with curious lumps under them. Jim Hoft's GatewayPundit had the picture sequence, along with a collection of reactions from assorted characters on Twitter, few of them being nice about it. But some were more thoughtful than others, with speculation on what really might be happening. Here is one:

 

The thread that followed from that tweet (on twitter beyond the GatewayPundit post) was even more interesting as health professionals with knowledge of medical equipment weighed in; here are the two most credible speculations:

 

July 22, 2018

 

 

 

According to the Cleveland Clinic:

The Foley catheter is a tube that helps drain urine from the bladder. It is used by some patients who have had urological or gynecological surgery, or who have a condition that makes urination difficult. The urinary (Foley) catheter is placed into the bladder through the urethra, the opening through which urine passes.

So aside from the unwieldly appearance of Clinton, the presence of what appears to be medical equipment on her raises more questions about her health, which is relevant in the wake of her continued presidential ambitions.

It also raises questions again about how honest she is, given that she continuously claims she's in good health, with only the most minor of conditions, like allergies.

Already, we know she's fainted in public, most famously during the 2016 9/11 ceremony in New York, at the height of her presidential campaign. She came out and said she was just fine, with just a bit of pneumonia, something nobody believed.

She took abnormally long bathroom breaks during at least one televised presidential debate, returning to her podium strangely late as other candidates carried on without her. This might be related to wearing a catheter.

She's been spotted in thick, heavy winter coats on boiling hot days, which is also odd.

She's been spotted with what appears to be back brace sticking out strangely through her clothing.

She's been photographed in a series of recent stumbles and falls.

Now, I supposed someone who has to wear a catheter isn't going to be anxious to announce it to anyone, and understandably so, because it's one of those embarrassing medical conditions people getting up there in years frequently have to deal with.

But it also could be a good thing for a politician to discuss, too. Being open about it destigmatizes it, and cuts the embarassment factor, and gives a pol a reputation for courage, as Betty Ford once did in admitting she was an alcoholic and seekin treatment. It's the kind of thing that may win over some voters. It also could be argued to be a political strength in another sense: Anyone with as many medical conditions as she has who can still keep up with a hectic public schedule can credibly insist she's got a lot of energy. It can also be argued it's none of anyone's business given that she's out of office.

But the news reports have been steady that she's still out there and she still means to run. In that case, she does need to be upfront about it along with all her health issues. She's not, so she will continue to get these uncharitable catcalls and the steady stream of speculation about her apparent undeclared medical issues, coming as they do as she continues to declare she's in the peak of health. The problem is less the health problems than the continuous denials of health problems. This is why voters don't trust her.

Hot summer day, and Hillary Clinton was spotted again at a public speaking event, wearing voluminous clothes - with curious lumps under them. Jim Hoft's GatewayPundit had the picture sequence, along with a collection of reactions from assorted characters on Twitter, few of them being nice about it. But some were more thoughtful than others, with speculation on what really might be happening. Here is one:

 

The thread that followed from that tweet (on twitter beyond the GatewayPundit post) was even more interesting as health professionals with knowledge of medical equipment weighed in; here are the two most credible speculations:

 

July 22, 2018

 

 

 

According to the Cleveland Clinic:

The Foley catheter is a tube that helps drain urine from the bladder. It is used by some patients who have had urological or gynecological surgery, or who have a condition that makes urination difficult. The urinary (Foley) catheter is placed into the bladder through the urethra, the opening through which urine passes.

So aside from the unwieldly appearance of Clinton, the presence of what appears to be medical equipment on her raises more questions about her health, which is relevant in the wake of her continued presidential ambitions.

It also raises questions again about how honest she is, given that she continuously claims she's in good health, with only the most minor of conditions, like allergies.

Already, we know she's fainted in public, most famously during the 2016 9/11 ceremony in New York, at the height of her presidential campaign. She came out and said she was just fine, with just a bit of pneumonia, something nobody believed.

She took abnormally long bathroom breaks during at least one televised presidential debate, returning to her podium strangely late as other candidates carried on without her. This might be related to wearing a catheter.

She's been spotted in thick, heavy winter coats on boiling hot days, which is also odd.

She's been spotted with what appears to be back brace sticking out strangely through her clothing.

She's been photographed in a series of recent stumbles and falls.

Now, I supposed someone who has to wear a catheter isn't going to be anxious to announce it to anyone, and understandably so, because it's one of those embarrassing medical conditions people getting up there in years frequently have to deal with.

But it also could be a good thing for a politician to discuss, too. Being open about it destigmatizes it, and cuts the embarassment factor, and gives a pol a reputation for courage, as Betty Ford once did in admitting she was an alcoholic and seekin treatment. It's the kind of thing that may win over some voters. It also could be argued to be a political strength in another sense: Anyone with as many medical conditions as she has who can still keep up with a hectic public schedule can credibly insist she's got a lot of energy. It can also be argued it's none of anyone's business given that she's out of office.

But the news reports have been steady that she's still out there and she still means to run. In that case, she does need to be upfront about it along with all her health issues. She's not, so she will continue to get these uncharitable catcalls and the steady stream of speculation about her apparent undeclared medical issues, coming as they do as she continues to declare she's in the peak of health. The problem is less the health problems than the continuous denials of health problems. This is why voters don't trust her.