What do they bring to the table?

Critical to the contentious and ongoing immigration debate is the undeniable fact that low-skilled jobs, requiring little to no formal education, are disappearing or being phased out of almost every industry in America.  In the age of a rapidly changing work force, the Democrat initiative to flood the country with people who can't compete in today's job market is myopic, not to mention fiscally irresponsible.

Unlike in the United States, the process of legal immigration in Australia is strict.  It's highly regulated and involves a lengthy process for anyone wishing to relocate permanently to the land down under.  In fact, part of the Australian immigration application process is proof of employment – prior to arriving – in addition to a proven ability of every applicant to financially support himself.  Preference is given to potential new citizens who have a college degree or skill set in engineering, medicine, and technology.  Work visas are granted, but the number is abysmally small compared to the number the government receives each year.  Furthermore, the official language of Australia is English.  In order to be employed in almost every sector of industry, applicants must speak, read, and write English fluently.

Australia is just one example of a handful of countries that require immigrants to bring something to the table.  In other words, the immigrant must first prove that he will not be a financial drain on society and will contribute positively to the community.  

First and foremost, people crossing the U.S. southern border are uneducated, illiterate, and lacking any real-world skill set.  Strike one: They are, for the most part, shut out of the highly competitive, educated American work force, consigned to manual labor in the service, restaurant, agriculture, or hospitality industry.  With that in mind, there is a finite number of low-skilled labor jobs available – there are only so many lawns to mow, toilets to clean, restaurant dishes to wash, and hotel rooms to be vacuumed.

Despite the Democrat canard about immigrants doing the jobs that Americans refuse to do, even some of those jobs are disappearing – for example, taking fast food orders at the counter.  The CEO of McDonald's recently announced that all McDonald's restaurants in the U.S. will be outfitted with computer order kiosks over the next few years.  No doubt, other fast food restaurants will follow the lead of McDonald's.  That alone equates to a sharp reduction in employees, many of whom are low-skilled, barely educated immigrants, young and middle-aged.

The same kind of technology innovations are also occurring in the agriculture industry; automated harvesting machines are replacing human hands.  Ever see a machine shake a pecan tree and catch falling pecans in a steel hopper?  I have.

Strike two: The vast majority of new arrivals, whether they be illegal aliens or refugees, don't speak English.  A first-generation immigrant will never bother learning to read or write English, either.  They don't have to.  If allowed to stay in the U.S., they gravitate toward predominantly minority neighborhoods, where everyone speaks some form of their native tongue.  Firsters may acquire enough English to get by, but for the most part, they will continue to speak their native languages at home, in their communities, and within their family circles, which severely limits their employment opportunities.  If they do seek work outside the home, they will be in the company of people much like themselves: uneducated, low-skilled manual laborers.

Unfortunately, this segment of American society has one of three paths of livelihood in the U.S.: destined to stagnate in a service industry job with little upward job mobility, government dependence, or a life of crime.

The correlation between chronically unemployed foreign entrants to the U.S. and every category of violent crime in the United States is no coincidence.  There's a good reason why President Trump, with the help of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, is chasing down, rounding up, arresting, and deporting MS-13 gang members.  The majority of foreign-born MS-13 gang members have taken advantage of the easily accessible southern border for the sole purpose of expanding the drug trade in the United States.  Strike three for America.

Until stricter, highly regulated, and closely monitored border access is achieved, hordes of people who bring nothing to the table will continue to plague America.

Critical to the contentious and ongoing immigration debate is the undeniable fact that low-skilled jobs, requiring little to no formal education, are disappearing or being phased out of almost every industry in America.  In the age of a rapidly changing work force, the Democrat initiative to flood the country with people who can't compete in today's job market is myopic, not to mention fiscally irresponsible.

Unlike in the United States, the process of legal immigration in Australia is strict.  It's highly regulated and involves a lengthy process for anyone wishing to relocate permanently to the land down under.  In fact, part of the Australian immigration application process is proof of employment – prior to arriving – in addition to a proven ability of every applicant to financially support himself.  Preference is given to potential new citizens who have a college degree or skill set in engineering, medicine, and technology.  Work visas are granted, but the number is abysmally small compared to the number the government receives each year.  Furthermore, the official language of Australia is English.  In order to be employed in almost every sector of industry, applicants must speak, read, and write English fluently.

Australia is just one example of a handful of countries that require immigrants to bring something to the table.  In other words, the immigrant must first prove that he will not be a financial drain on society and will contribute positively to the community.  

First and foremost, people crossing the U.S. southern border are uneducated, illiterate, and lacking any real-world skill set.  Strike one: They are, for the most part, shut out of the highly competitive, educated American work force, consigned to manual labor in the service, restaurant, agriculture, or hospitality industry.  With that in mind, there is a finite number of low-skilled labor jobs available – there are only so many lawns to mow, toilets to clean, restaurant dishes to wash, and hotel rooms to be vacuumed.

Despite the Democrat canard about immigrants doing the jobs that Americans refuse to do, even some of those jobs are disappearing – for example, taking fast food orders at the counter.  The CEO of McDonald's recently announced that all McDonald's restaurants in the U.S. will be outfitted with computer order kiosks over the next few years.  No doubt, other fast food restaurants will follow the lead of McDonald's.  That alone equates to a sharp reduction in employees, many of whom are low-skilled, barely educated immigrants, young and middle-aged.

The same kind of technology innovations are also occurring in the agriculture industry; automated harvesting machines are replacing human hands.  Ever see a machine shake a pecan tree and catch falling pecans in a steel hopper?  I have.

Strike two: The vast majority of new arrivals, whether they be illegal aliens or refugees, don't speak English.  A first-generation immigrant will never bother learning to read or write English, either.  They don't have to.  If allowed to stay in the U.S., they gravitate toward predominantly minority neighborhoods, where everyone speaks some form of their native tongue.  Firsters may acquire enough English to get by, but for the most part, they will continue to speak their native languages at home, in their communities, and within their family circles, which severely limits their employment opportunities.  If they do seek work outside the home, they will be in the company of people much like themselves: uneducated, low-skilled manual laborers.

Unfortunately, this segment of American society has one of three paths of livelihood in the U.S.: destined to stagnate in a service industry job with little upward job mobility, government dependence, or a life of crime.

The correlation between chronically unemployed foreign entrants to the U.S. and every category of violent crime in the United States is no coincidence.  There's a good reason why President Trump, with the help of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, is chasing down, rounding up, arresting, and deporting MS-13 gang members.  The majority of foreign-born MS-13 gang members have taken advantage of the easily accessible southern border for the sole purpose of expanding the drug trade in the United States.  Strike three for America.

Until stricter, highly regulated, and closely monitored border access is achieved, hordes of people who bring nothing to the table will continue to plague America.